PSYC: Psychology (Undergraduate)

PSYC 1005  Introduction to Psychology  (4 Credits)  

The purpose of this course is to gain an overview and examine the various disciplines, core concepts, and theories of psychology. The course will examine the basic concepts of psychology as a social science. Students will examine the major ideas/theories/disciplines within psychology, such as research methods, sensation/perception, memory, theories of personality, psychological disorders, social psychology, and others. Throughout this course, an emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of psychology as a science of human thought and behavior. This course was previously HDV-282164.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

PSYC 1050  General Psychology  (3 Credits)  

This course introduces students to psychological thinking, to scientific methodology and to some of the main areas/theories of psychology. It provides an overview of the evolution of psychology as a discipline and a range of applications of psychology. The course includes such topics as the history of psychology, the scientific approach to behavior, personality development and measurement, psychological disorders and treatment, and social influences on behavior. Students will learn how psychologists obtain their knowledge about human behavior and mental processes and on how this knowledge can be applied to everyday life. This is a classroom-based course currently only available to students in the College’s European programs.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 1996  Special Topics in PSYC  (2-4 Credits)  

The content of this course will vary by term and section. Students may repeat this course for credit as long as the topic differs. Please refer to the Term Guide for course topic offerings.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 1998  Individualized Studies in Psychology (PSYC)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Psychology (PSYC). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

PSYC 2005  Brain & Behavior  (4 Credits)  

This course offers an introductory overview of the functioning of the nervous system and how that functioning relates to behavior and experience. Students will have an introduction to the structure and function of the neuron, the synapse, and the anatomy and organization of the nervous system. Additional topics may include how the brain is influenced by drugs and hormones; how it mediates sensation and perception; the brain’s role in maintaining homeostasis; how the brain directs movement; and the brain’s role in cognition and emotion. There will be a focus on the interplay of genetics, physiology, and the environment in influencing behavior and mental processes. Implications of the field for the understanding and treatment of neurological and mental disorders may also be explored. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology, Human Development, or an equivalent course. Some background in human biology and anatomy and physiology may also be helpful.

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

PSYC 2010  Deviant Behavior  (4 Credits)  

This course focuses on the theory and research in social construction of social norms, the violation of norms, and social reaction to the violation of norms. Topics may include: the role of social structure and power in the definition of deviance; structural, cultural, and social psychological processes involved in deviant behavior; and the dynamics of social reaction to deviance from the norm.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 2020  Abnormal Psychology: Introductory  (4 Credits)  

This course deals with emotional and mental disorders. It will cover the dynamics, etiology, prevention, and treatment of psychological disorders (such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, psychotic disorders, and other abnormal personality patterns). Students will gain an understanding of major theories, concepts of psychopathology, and methods of diagnostic classification. Please note: Students are advised to consult with their mentor prior to enrolling in an introductory and an advanced level of the same or similar course title (e.g. Human Development: Introductory and Human Development: Advanced) as there can be significant redundancy in the content of courses. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 2025  Educational Psychology: Introductory  (4 Credits)  

The student will learn about principles in three areas related to education: growth and development; learning theories; and assessment/evaluation. Topics will include major theories of cognitive development, language development, and social/emotional development, including an emphasis on individual differences. Other major topics covered may include constructivist views of learning, issues of motivation, and various methods of assessment. Learning environments, including but not limited to schools, are discussed, with topics like classroom management, assessment of instructional objectives, and an overview of special populations included. Please note: Students are advised to consult with their mentor prior to enrolling in an introductory and an advanced level of the same or similar course title (e.g. Human Development: Introductory and Human Development: Advanced) as there can be significant redundancy in the content of developmental courses.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 2030  Social Psychology: Introductory  (4 Credits)  

This course includes a comprehensive overview of the research methods, concepts, and theories related to social psychology, the study of how individuals interact within their social environment. The purpose of this study is to gain an in-depth understanding of the various influences that people and social settings have upon the beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors of others. Significant social phenomena will be explored, along with major theoretical concepts and research within this field. Topics may include: conformity, obedience, collective/group behavior, media/persuasion, prejudice, and discrimination. Please note: Students are advised to consult with their mentor prior to enrolling in an introductory and an advanced level of the same or similar course title (e.g. Human Development: Introductory and Human Development: Advanced) as there can be significant redundancy in the content of courses. Before taking this course, students should have an understanding of the field of psychology as a science with specific methodologies; some basic knowledge of psychological theories/concepts/history.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

PSYC 2040  Theories of Personality: Introductory  (4 Credits)  

This course will examine the field’s major theories (such as trait, biological, psychoanalytic, humanistic, cross-cultural, and cognitive learning) for understanding personality. Personality structure, development, and dynamics will be explored from multiple perspectives. The study will cover what makes people similar and different from each other and how and why people think, feel, and act the way they do. Please note: Students are advised to consult with their mentor prior to enrolling in an introductory and an advanced level of the same or similar course title (e.g. Human Development: Introductory and Human Development: Advanced) as there can be significant redundancy in the content of courses.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 2045  Sports Psychology  (4 Credits)  

This course will examine major theories, concepts, and applications of sports psychology, as well as current research and studies of the principal topics within the field of sports psychology. Topics covered in this study may include: team dynamics, the use of imagery, anxiety and performance, children and sports, skills training, leadership, and burnout.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 2050  Stress & Coping  (4 Credits)  

This course covers the study of stress and its influence on health and well-being. Topics may include theories of stress; emotional, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms of stress; negative and positive stress; personal stressors; the influence of attitudes and beliefs on the experience of stress; personality and stress; specific types of stress, like job, family, and technology stress; and theory and research related to effectively coping with stress. Students will have an opportunity to consider personal stressors and coping, as well as how to assist others to better cope with stress.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 2998  Individualized Studies in Psychology (PSYC)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Psychology (PSYC). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

PSYC 3005  Addiction  (3-4 Credits)  

This course provides an overview of addictions from an interdisciplinary perspective: what is addiction, what are risk and protective factors, addiction epidemiology and monitoring system, etc. Different chemical substances are examined from a clinical perspective, including a historical overview of the use of alcohol and drugs and their influence on society and the impact on counselors’ strategies and methods. Attention is further paid to socio-cultural factors that contribute to drug use as well as current treatment perspectives. Prerequisites: Biology of the Brain or an equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3010  Abnormal Psychology: Advanced  (4 Credits)  

This course deals with emotional and mental disorders. It will cover the dynamics, etiology, prevention, and treatment of psychological disorders (such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, psychotic disorders, and other abnormal personality patterns). Students will gain an understanding of major theories, concepts of psychopathology, and methods of diagnostic classification. Please note: Students are advised to consult with their mentor prior to enrolling in an introductory and an advanced level of the same or similar course title (e.g. Human Development: Introductory and Human Development: Advanced) as there can be significant redundancy in the content of courses. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course. This course was previously HDV-284074 Abnormal Psychology: Advanced.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3015  Educational Psychology: Advanced  (4 Credits)  

The student will learn about principles in three areas related to education: growth and development; learning theories; and assessment/evaluation. Topics will include major theories of cognitive development, language development, and social/emotional development, including an emphasis on individual differences. Other major topics covered may include constructivist views of learning, issues of motivation, and various methods of assessment. Learning environments, including but not limited to schools, are discussed, with topics like classroom management, assessment of instructional objectives, and an overview of special populations included.Please note: Students are advised to consult with their mentor prior to enrolling in an introductory and an advanced level of the same or similar course title (e.g. Human Development: Introductory and Human Development: Advanced) as there can be significant redundancy in the content of developmental courses. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3020  Social Psychology: Advanced  (4 Credits)  

This course includes a comprehensive overview of the research methods, concepts, and theories related to social psychology, the study of how individuals interact within their social environment. The purpose of this study is to gain an in-depth understanding of the various influences that people and social settings have upon the beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors of others. Significant social phenomena will be explored, along with major theoretical concepts and research within this field. Topics might include conformity, obedience, collective/group behavior, media/persuasion, prejudice, and discrimination. Please note: Students are advised to consult with their mentor prior to enrolling in an introductory and an advanced level of the same or similar course title (e.g. Human Development: Introductory and Human Development: Advanced) as there can be significant redundancy in the content of courses. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course. Before taking this course, students should have an understanding of the field of psychology as a science with specific methodologies; some basic knowledge of psychological theories/concepts/history.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

PSYC 3025  Advanced Studies in Abnormal Psychology  (3 Credits)  

This course offers a systematic scientific study of abnormal psychology. Students will learn key concepts and issues as well as recognized disorders in the field of abnormal psychology. We will review definitions of 'abnormality' and common classification systems, current theoretical research in abnormal psychology, and basic theories about the neurological process involved in some abnormal psychological conditions. We will also look at the historical impact of psychological research and theory on the understanding of the etiology and diagnosis of abnormal psychological states; the concept of 'mental illness' and will consider current approaches to treatment. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3030  Theories of Personality: Advanced  (4 Credits)  

This course will examine the field’s major theories (such as trait, biological, psychoanalytic, humanistic, cross-cultural, and cognitive learning) for understanding personality. Personality structure, development, and dynamics will be explored from multiple perspectives. The study will cover what makes people similar and different from each other and how and why people think, feel, and act the way they do. Please note: Students are advised to consult with their mentor prior to enrolling in an introductory and an advanced level of the same or similar course title (e.g. Human Development: Introductory and Human Development: Advanced) as there can be significant redundancy in the content of courses. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3035  Behavior Disorders in Children & Adolescents  (4 Credits)  

This course will focus on the development and behavioral problems of children and adolescents, as well as the clinical methods for assessing and treating these problems. Specifically, students will identify the etiology of various behavioral disorders and become familiar with the DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, assessment methods, and interventions. Students will also utilize diagnostic criteria to evaluate and analyze behavior and mental functioning. Topics covered in this course may include: mental retardation, pervasive developmental disorders, schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, delinquency, substance abuse, anxiety and depression, disorders affecting physical functioning, and psychological aspects of medical problems and procedures. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent. Abnormal Psychology is highly recommended.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3040  Biological Psychology  (3,4 Credits)  

This course offers an in-depth overview of the functioning of the nervous system and how it mediates behavior and experience. In addition to structures and functions of the neuron, the synapse, and the anatomy and organization of the nervous system, topics may include how the brain is influenced by drugs and hormones; how it mediates sensation and perception; its role in maintaining homeostasis; how it directs movement; and its role in mediating cognition and emotion. These functions may be analyzed from evolutionary, genetic, and developmental perspectives, with the aim of understanding the complex interplay of genetics, physiology, and the environment in influencing behavior and mental processes. Implications of the field for the understanding and treatment of neurological and mental disorders will also be explored. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology, Human Development, or an equivalent course. Some background in human biology and/or anatomy and physiology might also be helpful. This course was previously HDV-283474.

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

PSYC 3045  Cognitive Psychology  (4 Credits)  

This course is an in-depth exploration of human cognition and relies heavily on experimental research designed to test models and theories of cognitive processes. It will explore both behavioral and neuropsychological approaches to data and theory. Topics may include attention, perception, multiple memory systems, encoding and retrieval processes, and the roles of knowledge, language, emotion, and reasoning. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course. This course was previously HDV-283514 .

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

PSYC 3050  Counseling Theories  (4 Credits)  

This course is designed to build on the student’s knowledge of psychology and provide an overview of the various schools of thought, mainstream theories, and approaches to counseling, such as psychoanalytic, existential, humanistic, person-centered, gestalt, reality, behavior, cognitive/behavior, feminist, and family systems. The course is a practical introduction to the fundamentals of counseling, such as how different theories propose to help people change, the characteristics of the role of the counselor, and the development of the client-counselor relationship. The course also emphasizes the importance of in-depth awareness about the counselor’s personal attitudes, values, and ethics, as well as the importance of being knowledgeable about cultural differences and issues. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course. This course was previously HDV-284044.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3055  Cultural Psychology  (4 Credits)  

Cultural psychology is the comparative study of cultural effects on human psychology. It examines psychological diversity and the links between cultural norms and behavior. It will examine the ways in which particular human activities are influenced by social and cultural forces. Students can expect to develop a broader, global perception of contemporary psychology. Activities are intended to explain current psychological knowledge and its applications from a cross-cultural perspective. Additionally, this course will assist in developing a useful set of critical-thinking tools with which to analyze and evaluate psychology from various cultural perspectives. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course. This course was previously HDV-283544.

Attributes: Other World Civilization Gn Ed, Liberal

PSYC 3065  Ethical Issues in Psychology  (4 Credits)  

This course will explore to the role of ethics in psychological practice and psychological science. Students will learn to integrate ethical principles with their own morals and values in hypothetical professional situations. There will be a focus on ethical decision making in the domains of clinical practice, teaching, and research. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3070  Evolutionary Psychology  (4 Credits)  

This course covers major concepts in the area of evolutionary psychology, such as the idea of psychological adaptation to social conditions that favored individuals for inclusion in the next generation of the species, as well as the distinct shaping of social behaviors that favored survival both of the individual and of the species. Topics may include the scientific movements that led to evolutionary psychology, including those leading up to the work of Charles Darwin and those developed after the work of Darwin. This course was previously HDV-283454.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3075  Experimental Psychology  (4 Credits)  

In this course the student will gain knowledge about and hands-on practice of experimental research methods in psychology. Students will learn how to plan, carry out, and analyze their own experimental research, and how to communicate the results of their research to others. Students will develop the knowledge and skills to apply the scientific method. Topics covered in this study may include: descriptive vs. experimental research, components of the scientific method, validity and reliability, independent and dependent variables, and hypothesis testing. Relevant ethical issues will also be examined. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course. This course was previously HDV-283354 .

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

PSYC 3085  Group Dynamics  (4 Credits)  

This course is designed to help students gain an understanding of concepts and principles and the various practice considerations, approaches, and processes relevant to individuals’ behavior in groups. Specific topics may include: group dynamics research and theory, including group-as-a-whole theory; the variables and stages related to group formation and development; the characteristics of group composition and structure; group leadership styles and patterns; different types of groups; issues related to group influence, power, performance, and decision-making; the influence of the physical environment on group behavior; effective versus ineffective group communication and interactional patterns; the effects of large groups on collective behavior; and the effect of culture on groups and individuals within groups. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3090  Health Psychology  (4 Credits)  

This course focuses on the various ways that psychology (the study of human behavior) influences and interacts with various health outcomes. Topics may include factors that influence seeking health care; adherence to medical advice; the experience of stress; the experience of pain; coping with stress and pain; behavior and chronic disease; preventing injuries; addictive behaviors and health; and issues related to weight control and exercise. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course. This course was previously HDV-284174 .

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3095  History & Systems of Psychology  (4 Credits)  

This course explores major developments and ideas in the history of psychology as an academic discipline. It addresses such topics as the history of ideas about the mind, key historical events that shaped the field, when and how psychology became a science, and the life histories of prominent psychologists. Although psychology really only became an independent discipline in the late 1800s and early 1900s, its history goes back much further than that, and this study will explore the origins of psychological thought and inquiry.

Attributes: Western Civilization Gen Ed, Liberal

PSYC 3100  Learning & Memory  (4 Credits)  

This course will examine major theories of conditioning, learning, and memory (such as behaviorism, cognitivism, and social learning), explore our current understanding of biological mechanisms of learning and memory, and consider applications of multiple theoretical perspectives in diverse fields such as behavior therapy, education, counseling, and law. The study will also examine cultural and age-related differences in memory and learning. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course. This course was previously HDV-283654 Learning and Memory.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3105  Principles of Testing & Measurement  (4 Credits)  

This course focuses on the basic principles, theories, issues, and practices in the field of psychological testing and assessment, a field that separates psychology from other mental health professions. While other professionals might use screening tools, risk assessments, and some types of measurements, only psychologists use tests to assess intelligence, personality, and other psychological constructs. This course will introduce how psychologists measure psychological constructs (like intelligence, emotions, and personality), as well as introduce students to common testing instruments that have been developed for the purpose of evaluating individuals. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, Theories of Personality, or an equivalent course. This course was previously HDV-283404 Principles of Testing and Measurement.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3110  Psychological Measurements  (3 Credits)  

This course provides an introduction to the use and limitations of psychological assessment techniques and measurement instruments for assessing ability, aptitude, achievement, intelligence, personality, and abnormalities. The course will cover the basic principles of measurement theory, including validity and reliability, on testing and measurement of psychological constructs, techniques for administration, and interpretation of results. Trends and problems associated with the interpretation and use of results for decision-making will be considered together with ethical and legal issues. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3115  Psychology of Aging  (4 Credits)  

In this course, students will learn about the interplay between physical and physiological changes, cognitive changes, behavioral changes, societal expectations, and their psychological impacts on aging adults. Current research, theory, and case examples will present perspectives on the experience of older adults. Topics may include challenges often faced by older adults, how older adults are portrayed in literature and the media, milestones and developmental markers strived for in aging, cultural perspectives on the psychology of aging, and perspectives on positive aging. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology, Human Development, or an equivalent course. This course was previously HDV-284224 .

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3120  Psychology of Diversity  (3 Credits)  

This course introduces students to theoretical, philosophical, and experiential frameworks for thinking about diversity in our communities and society as they relate to social justice. It includes an examination of the experiences of diverse groups, especially traditionally oppressed groups and individuals. This course is designed to engage students in a process of introspection and self-examination about issues such as racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia. Emphasis will be placed on challenging our own world view and the way it fits into institutional oppression. We will also discuss and research theories that explain why such inequalities are perpetuated as well as possible solutions to inequality. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology of equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3122  Psychology of Creativity  (4 Credits)  

Creativity and innovation are complex psychological processes that play an important role in various academic fields and human activities. Creativity can be considered in terms of various psychological concepts such as personality, cognition, learning, and biological processes. We also know that creativity can be developed and is not fixed. This course will look at the research on various methods of developing creativity in terms of how creativity works, what products are considered creative, what it means to be a creative person, and what social contexts support creativity.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3125  Psychology of Gender  (3 Credits)  

Gender generally refers to the social, emotional, cognitive, and behavioral expressions of being male or female. Students will examine the concept of gender and its psychological manifestations. Students will use theory and research to apply gender concepts to an understanding of the behavior and attitudes of self and others. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology and Biology of the Brain or their equivalent. This is a classroom-based course currently only available to students in Prague.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3127  Psychology of Love  (4 Credits)  

This course focuses on the psychological aspects of love and the various ways it is demonstrated in human behavior including romantic love, as well as various nonromantic types such as love of family, friends, animals, country, etc. Research on love will be considered in terms of both biological as well as psychological factors. How various types of love develop, how love is experienced, how it is expressed, cultural and social factors that influence love, as well as how it can be lost will all be considered.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3130  The Impact of Culture on Psychological Processes  (3 Credits)  

This advanced level liberal arts course in psychology introduces students to some of the core research and theory in cultural and cross-cultural psychology, including an examination of important ways in which perception, emotion, judgment, morality, etc. depends on culture. It explores some of the controversy and debate as to the extent to which psychology is inherently cultural or to which studying cultural differences is necessary to understanding psychological processes. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3132  Investigative Psychology: Offender Profiling & Criminal Psychogeography  (3,4 Credits)  

This course examines “investigative psychology”, a branch of the discipline which concerns itself with criminal action and attendant psychological processes/behavioral actions which are said to occasion or accompany such action. It has a much narrower focus than forensic psychology, being largely focused on criminal activity and police investigation, and primarily originated from the work of Professor David Canter who was invited to aid an investigation into a serial rapist in the UK. From its very outset, it was very much focused on its practical application. The entire idea of criminal profiling remains controversial. It is still far from clear whether it is a task which can be accomplished. It is often portrayed in the media as an art or an intuitive skill set. Allied of course, to a “knowledge” of the elusive psychopathology of the unknown criminal via psychodiagnostic assessment, psychobiographies and evidence from previous cases, finally contributing to the “profile”. Or, as some have objected, the “guess”. Nevertheless, offender profiling has been extended far beyond its original remit of serious crime and its original classificatory system of organized/disorganized crime. In addition, it does seem able, to some extent, to offer some insight into the mode and manner in which criminals interact with, and within, their physical environment, predicting home locations of serial offenders.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3135  The Use of Experimental Methods in Psychology  (3 Credits)  

This course surveys experimental psychology in its approach to psychological phenomena, methodological process of building research projects, practical steps during research, and the advantages of triangulation of different research methods. Students examine the major fields of psychology from a research perspective, both to illuminate the experimental methods used to examine psychological phenomena and to explore the variety of approaches currently employed. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3140  Theories of Personality: Advanced  (3 Credits)  

This course provides a systematic study of clinical practice of personality styles and the principal theories, with particular emphasis on recent trends, research methodology, and personality measurement. This course examines the major personality styles and personality development, beginning with the specific personality styles, and then continuing with theories examining biological factors and the influence of learning. Theoretical perspectives will be explored with an eye towards their practical and clinical usefulness in explaining behavior, and in facilitating therapeutic solutions. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course. This is a classroom-based course currently only available to students in Prague.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3145  Trauma & Stressor-Related Disorders  (3,4 Credits)  

This course focuses on building an understanding of the theory, research, and clinical information related to Trauma and Stressor-Related Disorders, with an emphasis on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Topics may include etiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and challenges related to traumatic disorders; the nature of trauma and stressor-related disorders and how they present; research on these disorders and their treatment; history of how these disorders came to be understood; the means and methods of screening, assessment/evaluation, and treatment; and future directions in the field. This course was previously HDV-284344 Trauma and Stressor-Related Disorders.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3996  Special Topics in PSYC  (2-4 Credits)  

The content of this course will vary by term and section. Students may repeat this course for credit as long as the topic differs. Please refer to the Term Guide for course topic offerings.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 3998  Individualized Studies in Psychology (PSYC)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Psychology (PSYC). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

PSYC 4010  Applied Social Psychology  (4 Credits)  

This study is intended to build upon knowledge already gained in a foundational course in Social Psychology by combining the science and theory of social psychology with the practical application of solving problems in the real world. Emphasis will be placed on applications in areas that may include: prejudice and intergroup relations, education, self-esteem, behavior modification, consumer behavior, and industrial/organizational psychology. Prerequisites: Social Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4015  Counseling Theories  (3 Credits)  

This advanced, liberal arts study introduces the student to the most influential theories and practices of counseling and psychotherapy, looking at their historical evolution, their current role, and their practical application in applied contexts. Prerequisites: This course should be taken during the student’s final year of study and after completing most of the concentration courses.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4020  Ecopsychology  (4 Credits)  

Ecopsychology is the study of how people think and feel about nature, including both healthy and unhealthy relationships, attitudes, and behaviors toward the natural world, as well as the effect that nature has on people. This course investigates whether humans have an innate connection with nature and how the disruption of this connection can impact health and well-being. Topics may include: issues related to spirituality, as they relate to humans’ place in the natural world; the role of culture and humans’ relationship with nature; whether humans are truly separate from or part of the natural world; and methods for improving humans’ relationship with nature.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4025  Human Sexuality  (4 Credits)  

This course focuses on human sexuality. Topics may include: the anatomy and physiology of the male and female body, including how hormones influence psychology and behavior; typical and atypical gender roles; romantic love; sexual behaviors, both typical and atypical; and communication issues related to the topic of sex. Sexually transmitted diseases and infections, as well as sexual abuse, may also be covered. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course. This course was previously HDV-283334 .

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4030  Media Psychology  (4 Credits)  

This course engages a comprehensive look at the foundations, history, methodology, and contemporary issues facing the field of media psychology. Topics may include violence and sexuality, ethnic portrayals, and persuasion, as well as current research on the areas of parasocial theory, social media, and the effects of media on development. Differing uses and effects throughout the lifespan are discussed with a recognition that media plays a different role in childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and for the aging adult. An emphasis in media across cultures is included. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4035  Multicultural Counseling  (4 Credits)  

This course focuses on the multiple dimensions related to competent multicultural counseling. Major racial groups are studied, along with the counseling, social justice, and advocacy approaches appropriate to each. In a similar fashion, the overarching cultural context of relationships, including factors such as age, race, gender, sexual orientation, religious and spiritual values, mental and physical characteristics, education, family values, socioeconomic status, and within-group as well as between-group cultural differences are examined. Theories of multicultural counseling, such as identity development, pluralistic trends, and systems-oriented intervention strategies (couple, family, group, and community), are considered. Counselor cultural self-awareness and the role of counseling in eliminating biases, prejudice, oppression, and discrimination are emphasized. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4040  Narrative Counseling  (4 Credits)  

This course will encompass an overview of historical, philosophical, and ideological aspects of narrative and social constructionist perspectives, with a focus on counseling practices. Topics may include: locating problems in their sociocultural context, opening space for alternative stories, developing stories, questioning, reflecting, thickening plots, spreading the news, and issues of ethics in the therapeutic relationship. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4045  Narrative Psychology  (4 Credits)  

This course will explore the concept of 'self as story' by examining the perspectives of several narrative theorists. Narrative psychology is an interdisciplinary perspective concerned with the process of meaning-making; it is a way of viewing self and self-in-the-world, a framework for conceptualizing personality and human nature and lived experience. Topics may include: the meaning of stories in a life; becoming a 'mythmaker;' agentic and communal 'imagoes' (or personal archetypes); the development of a narrative sense of self; exploring your myth, as well as life stories; the autobiographical self ('storying' life and identity); reading lives like a text; the need for narrative development, stories, and memory; the quest for meaning; and transforming and transcending our life stories. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4050  Positive Psychology  (4 Credits)  

This course will cover the study of psychology from a positive perspective. Topics may include positive emotional and cognitive states and processes; prosocial behavior and altruism; understanding and changing human behavior from a positive perspective; positive environments; and the future of the field of psychology from a positive psychological perspective. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4055  Psychology of Men: Theoretical & Clinical Approaches  (4 Credits)  

This course will focus on psychological issues related to men and boys. Issues related to men may include: depression, substance abuse, and trauma; specific contexts of men, such as colleges, the military, and even school age boys; various forms of masculinity; how gender-role strain, masculine ideologies, roles, identities, and sexual orientation affect men; and current approaches to working with men in the therapeutic setting, including various modalities that include new psychoanalytic models, as well as cognitive, interpersonal, integrative, group, and family therapies, and their effectiveness for boys and men. How socialization of men and boys affects the therapeutic process may also be discussed. Additionally, cross-cultural considerations with men, such as African American, Latino, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender, Asian American, and religious populations, can provide a diverse approach to possible therapies. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4060  Sensation & Perception  (4 Credits)  

This course will examine the concepts, theories, and methods employed to study sensation and perception from a scientific perspective. Topics will range from reception of various physical stimuli and transduction and transmission of signals within the nervous system, to coding, interpretation, and representation in the brain. These approaches will be applied to the major sensory systems. Additional themes that may be explored include development and change over the lifespan, perceptual constancies, perceptual illusions, attention, and spatial perception. While it is not required, it might be helpful if students have taken Introduction to Psychology or an equivalent course. This course was previously HDV-284364 Sensation and Perception.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4065  The Psychology of Fan Behavior  (4 Credits)  

This course deals with prevailing theories about fan behavior, as well as various approaches to the study of fan/celebrity relationships and the group psychology that develops in the social situations that involve fans and fandom. Included are applications of attachment theory to the fan/celebrity paradigm. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4070  Research Methods in Psychology  (3-4 Credits)  

This is an advanced study building upon a previous course in experimental psychology. Students will use their previous learning in experimental psychology, the methodological process of building research projects and practical steps during research, to generate their own experimental research design and to critique experimental research. Prerequisites: A previous course in Experimental Psychology or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4075  Topics in Developmental Psychology  (3 Credits)  

The course explores a selection of the most influential theoretical approaches within Developmental Psychology. The student is expected to compare and contrast theories of development, consider their applications, and develop a critical approach. Prerequisites: Introduction to Psychology and Biology of the Brain or their equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4080  Forensic Psychology  (4 Credits)  

This advanced course will provide students with a theoretical overview for understanding the specific principles important to the field of forensic psychology. Topics may include: the role of psychology in civil and criminal law; the forensic ethics code and its implications; forensic assessment strategies; the insanity defense; and "expert" court testimony by psychologists. Students will explore the role of forensic psychologists and the clinical and legal issues they face. This course was previously HDV-284164.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4122  Moral Psychology  (4 Credits)  

This course will cover the field of moral psychology by examining findings related to how emotions, personality, moral intuition, as well as the possibility of innate moral understandings contribute to thinking and behavior. The course will cover the major theories of moral development including Freud, Piaget, and Kohlberg, among others. Various perspectives on moral development will be explored including cognitive development theories, neuroscience approaches, as well as evolutionary perspectives. Applications will focus on the role of empathy and its development, as well as the role of morals in talk therapy and character education.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4123  Senior Project Proposal  (2 Credits)  

The student will prepare a proposal for the senior project and engage in educational planning. The senior project facilitates the integration and reflection of knowledge acquired from university learning which is aimed at creating an original culminating work. Educational planning includes the preparation of a rationale essay articulating how the program of study for the bachelor's degree meets the student's educational and career goals. For the senior project proposal, the student will pose a question to be addressed under the guidance of the ESC mentor. The student and mentor will discuss the focus and design of the research question to be developed. The student will identify the appropriate resources needed to address the question and submit the proposal to the mentor. The thesis, based on the proposal submitted for this study, will be carried out the following semester. This course will be used as part of the Educational Planning credit. Prerequisites: As part of a capstone course, students should enroll in Senior Project Proposal during their final year of study. All lower level concentration courses should be complete, as well as at least two advanced level concentration courses or their equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4150  Senior Project Thesis  (3 Credits)  

The student will complete the senior project thesis as planned in the proposal phase of this study. The project provides an opportunity to conduct an in-depth examination of a topic of interest related to the study program that emerged from the student’s earlier course work, and in this regard will complete educational planning by focusing on the mastery of academic skills, college level writing and presentation, and independent research and critical thinking. The student will be expected to produce a major research paper that meets the standards established during the proposal stage and prepare the final drafts of the rationale essay. This course will be used as part of the Educational Planning credit. Prerequisites: Successful completion of the Senior Project Proposal.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4996  Special Topics in Psych  (4 Credits)  

The content of this course will vary by term and section. Students may repeat this course for credit as long as the topic differs. Please refer to the Term Guide for course topic offerings.

Attributes: Liberal

PSYC 4998  Individualized Studies in Psychology (PSYC)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Psychology (PSYC). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.