SOCI: Sociology (Undergraduate)

SOCI 1005  Exploring Society: An Introduction to Sociology  (4 Credits)  

This introductory study explores the body of knowledge we call 'sociology'-the study of how humans construct their social worlds and how human interactions are influenced by that world. Students will learn about the history of sociology, about the major theories and ways of thinking sociologists have used to make sense of our world, and about key concepts such as class, race, status, ethnicity, gender, socialization, deviance, social control, power and social structure. Students also will be introduced to various research methods social scientists use to help us understand society and the many significant debates about social issues that we face today. This course was previously SOC-282124 Exploring Society.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

SOCI 1010  Intercultural Interaction  (4 Credits)  

Whether it is distinct cultural groups or sub-cultures, different cultural and social groups are forced to work together locally, nationally, and globally. The goal of this course is the development of a conceptual framework to understand, analyze, and interpret dynamics of intercultural communication. Students will develop or further their awareness, understanding, and appreciation of the richness of human cultures and the challenges and opportunities that intercultural interaction has to offer.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 1998  Individualized Studies in Sociology (SOCI)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Sociology (SOCI). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

SOCI 2010  Introduction to Race Class & Gender  (4 Credits)  

In this introductory course, students will gain an overview of the ways in which race, class, and gender shape individuals’ identities and experiences, as well as social institutions, in the United States, both today and in the past. Students will become familiar with major social science approaches to inequality, power, and oppression. More specifically, students will examine how race, class, gender, and other forms of social difference constitute intersecting systems of identity, solidarity, and oppression that impact everyone’s lives. This course was previously SOC-282264 Thinking About Race, Class and Gender.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

SOCI 2998  Individualized Studies in Sociology (SOCI)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Sociology (SOCI). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

SOCI 3005  Advertising & Society  (4 Credits)  

Advertising is omnipresent in U.S. society, however few people consider or understand its impact on individuals or the culture. This course is designed to introduce the student to the advertising process, to provide critical perspectives of advertising as a social phenomenon and to encourage students to be more aware and analytical of the advertising messages in his/her daily life.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3010  Aging & Society  (4 Credits)  

This course focuses on aging as part of the human life cycle. Topics may include: biological and psychological aspects of aging; an examination of aging in various cultures; changing views of aging in the United States; how aging affects different segments of our diverse population; death and dying; health and support services for the aging; and social policy issues. This course was previously HDV-283254 Aging and Society.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3015  Analyzing Race Class & Gender  (3-4 Credits)  

In this advanced level course, students will analyze the historical and contemporary reality of race, class, and gender on a global level. Students will critically examine race, class, and gender as intersecting systems of identity, solidarity and oppression that affect everyone’s lives. The social construction of race, class, gender, and other forms of social difference will be emphasized. Topics may include: white privilege, double consciousness, prejudice, discrimination, segregation, neoliberalism, and/or globalization.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3020  Memory & Society  (4 Credits)  

Memory and identity are deeply intertwined. Is there such a thing as individual memory? How do social groups determine what is remembered? When social groups change their understanding or interpretation of an event, how is memory altered? This course examines the construction of memory, transformation of the private experience into the public memory, commemoration of nationalist identity, and the memory dilemma of transnationalism and cosmopolitanism.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3025  Contemporary Global Social Issues  (4 Credits)  

This advanced level course critically analyzes what constitutes global economic, political, and/or cultural issues and problems. Students will use sociological theoretical perspectives to analyze and interpret global responses and possible solutions to these social issues. Topics may include state sovereignty, globalization, transnationalism, global conflicts, the environment, and/or social movements. Prerequisites: at least one course (or equivalent knowledge) in the discipline of a social science. This course was previously SOC-284544 Contemporary Global Social Issues.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3030  Cooperation & Competition  (4 Credits)  

This course examines the importance of understanding the social, economic, cultural, and psychological dynamics of ethnic conflict as it exists in multicultural societies. As such it is a global phenomenon deeply rooted in competition. The purpose of this course therefore is to provide students access to a conceptual framework and, in the context of specific studies, address theoretical perspectives used to analyze cooperation, competition, globalization, colonialism, and ethnic conflict. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Intro to Sociology and/or Intro to Psychology, Intro to Macroeconomics.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3035  Corruption Civil Society & Social Trust  (3,4 Credits)  

This course aims at conveying basic knowledge about the contemporary research on corruption, including causes, consequences, different forms/levels of corruption, and the basic methods of measuring and fighting corruption. Over the past twenty years, scholars, policy makers and academics have devoted increasing attention to the study of corruption as an obstacle to development. Corruption is now thought of as a serious social ill having detrimental effects on economic prosperity, people’s perceived satisfaction with life, social trust, political legitimacy, and economic equality. In addition, low quality of government is also a causal factor behind violent political conflicts, both inter- and intra-state, and this has also led to an increased interest in the negative effects of corruption on rebuilding post-conflict societies and establishing representative democracy. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Intro to Sociology and/or Cultural Anthropology, Modern China, or other emerging market nations where corruption impacts the society and economy.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3040  Deviance & Social Control  (4 Credits)  

This course offers a comparative, historical and critical analysis of deviance and social control. The identification and enforcement of societal norms, values, sanctions, laws and punishment will be analyzed. The role of labeling and the subversive appropriation of labels by oppositional and deviant subcultures will also be addressed. This course was previously SOC-263634 Deviance and Social Control.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3045  Disaster & Society  (4 Credits)  

What is a disaster? How do social structures, individuals, groups, and institutions react to the loss of social function that occurs as a result of natural, technological, or sociopolitical disaster events? This course explores individual, community, and social causes and effects of disaster from sociological, political, and historical perspectives. Prerequisites: A previous course (or equivalent knowledge) in social theory or social science. This course was previously SOC-283434 Disaster and Society.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3050  Emotions & Social Interaction  (4 Credits)  

Social interaction is such a ripe domain for emotion. Emotions are a bridge between the individual and their connection to others and society. In a sense, emotions respond to, are regulated by, and in many ways constitute social relationships. Most of what occurs in social interactions is significant only as it is interpreted through an elaborate system of personally and culturally defined meanings. These lie at the heart of emotion. The goal of the course is to develop an understanding of how human emotions are communicated and how emotions respond to, are regulated by, and constitute social relationships.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3055  Family & Society  (4 Credits)  

Students will explore the social institution of family, its variations, structures and functions within the United States. Students will examine how political, historic, economic and social conditions have had an impact on the evolution of the family as a unit as well as on its internal dynamics. As the family, however it is defined, connects private life with the public world, students might also examine this social institution in the contexts of: public policy, workplace, education, and/or other social institutions. Students will also examine "the family" within the contexts of race, class, gender and explore current debates about evolving family structures, i.e. same sex marriage, adoption, surrogate parenting, etc. Finally, students will explore how social scientists design studies and collect and analyze data that underlies the various theoretical perspectives on these issues. Prerequisites: Introduction to Sociology, Social Problems or some comparable prior learning This will differ from human development Family and Society studies which will focus more on family dynamics and social impact. This course was previously HDV-283304 Family and Society.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3060  Food Systems & Social Justice  (4 Credits)  

Where does our food come from and what is the Global Food System? This course examines theintersections of local, regional, national, and global interests, the effects of industrial agriculture, the ecological and social impact of Western consumerism, and global flows of foodstuffs. Social justice issues on the local, global, and environmental levels will be discussed, such as, surpluses (e.g. obesity epidemic), shortages(e.g. urban food deserts and global famines), and environmental degradation.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3065  Perspectives on Terrorism  (4 Credits)  

This course explores the history, politics, psychology, and social policy of terrorism. Students examine possible connections between philosophical discourse, social change, and the psychology of fear related to acts or threatened acts of terrorism. This course was previously CHS-264684 Perspectives on Terrorism.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3075  Protest Music in History  (4 Credits)  

This course identifies and defines the role of protest music within specific cultural contexts, analyzing the relationship between critical music and social movements, utilizing an historical perspective. Students may select protest music from the U.S. or other cultures with which they are familiar.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3080  Social History of Surfing  (4 Credits)  

Drawing from cultural sociology, music, the arts, history, anthropology, leisure studies, and ocean eco-activism, this study offers an interdisciplinary, critical perspective on surfing with an emphasis on the USA. From local to global, students will examine surfing’s rising status from a 1960’s outlaw subculture to a multi-million dollar industry to a new Olympic Games competitive sport (2020). This course also considers the role of colonialism, cultural appropriation, social class, sex, race, coastal community norms and regionalism in surfing’s history.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3085  Social Memoir as Social Action  (4 Credits)  

Social memoir is a form of witnessing, truth-telling, and self-healing A literary genre and an advocacy tool. Writing social memoir moves the individual from case-to-cause, making the personal the political, and the solitary experience a social one. Students will craft their own social memoirs, and will evaluate existing published works.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3090  Social Movements  (4 Credits)  

The course focuses on conservative, alternative and progressive social movements in history and contemporary society. The student will have the opportunity to select and examine local, national or global movements applying critical social science perspectives to specific social movements.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3095  Sociology of Education  (4 Credits)  

This course examines education in American society from various sociological perspectives. Students will explore the relationship between education, social structures, and social interactions. Major issues in the field of education will be identified and analyzed from a sociological perspective.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3100  Sociology of Law  (4 Credits)  

This sociology study focuses on law and legal systems as products of social structure. As such, this social institution is influenced by political, economic, social, historical and cultural shifts as societies evolve. At the same time, the way societies evolve is affected by the operation and outcomes of the legal system. In many ways, the law defines and drives our understandings and ideas about our social context, such as the meanings of gender and race, what behavior should be criminalized, how the economy works, etc. This study, then, integrates learning in many other areas including psychology, gender, race, class, inequality, social change, social movements, history, etc. How the study will evolve depends greatly on an individual student’s learning and professional goals as well as their interests. Prerequisites: Introduction to Law, Introduction to Sociology, advanced law or sociology studies; OR comparable prior learning Studies in other disciplines such as history, psychology, sociology, etc. will enhance the learning in this study. NOTE: This study could function as a capstone study for a concentration in Law and Society and/or Legal Studies. OR it could function as a first study in these concentrations after foundational studies are completed.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3105  Sociology of Punishment  (4 Credits)  

Students completing this study will examine why and how certain behaviors are criminalized and the social history of punishment for those behaviors, focusing on imprisonment as the pre-eminent form of punishment for illegal conduct used by modern American society. Through various readings and discussion the student will consider these issues: who is punished and why; how have historical, economic, social and cultural changes influenced the way American society address illegal behavior; history of incarceration in the United States; current issues and debates? Prerequisites: introductory sociology, psychology and/or criminal justice studies; OR comparable prior learning Studies in other disciplines such as history, psychology, sociology, etc. will enhance the learning in this study.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3110  Sports & Society  (4 Credits)  

This course examines sport as a social construction that provides valuable insights to society. Topics may include: how sport is used as an agent of socialization; how gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status influences sport participation; how deviance is defined in sports; the role of sport in a global perspective; how sports interact with other social institutions. This course was previously SOC-284424 Sports and Society.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3115  Suicide: The Individual & Society  (4 Credits)  

How does a sociologist explain suicide? How is this perspective different from others, such as psychology, medicine, or religion? Emile Durkheim's seminal study of suicide systematically examines the relationship between the individual and the social structure. Students will evaluate sociological concepts such as alienation, anomie, integration and engagement as mitigating actors in suicide. Historical and contemporary case studies will be reviewed.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3120  Surveillance & Society  (3 Credits)  

This course examines the topic of surveillance in society from cultural and sociological perspectives. Students explore the topic through an interdisciplinary analysis of contemporary scholarship. We will also examine the historical roots of surveillance and privacy to understand how various forms of control have emerged and are manifested in our daily life. This course is designed to articulate with other studies about society and the workplace. In particular, it is designed to sensitize learners to the challenges and trade-offs that are encountered in social systems and to allow learners to consider similar issues and challenges that are present, or which are evolving, in their social and work worlds.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3125  The Sociological Imagination  (4 Credits)  

This course examines the work of C.W. Mills as a cornerstone of sociological thought. The idea of a 'sociological imagination,' first proposed by Mills, situates the social actor at the intersection of biography, society, and history. How does this impact how we view the social world? Learn how to understand the connections between what we often consider to be the 'private' problems of the individual with broader social issues that affect us all.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3130  Contemporary US Society  (4 Credits)  

In this course, students will explore a variety of issues, problems, realities and criticisms of contemporary American society. By reading from a range of sources on different topics relevant to American society today, students will examine ways in which cultural, social, political and economic factors influence the structure of society and the experiences of those who are part of it.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

SOCI 3135  Religion in the US Today  (4 Credits)  

In this course, students will focus on what 'religion' is, about the range of religious expressions in American society today, and about the multiple connections between religion and society. In effect, the study will focus around two broad questions: What are the effects of religions and religious beliefs upon society? And, how can we think about religion as a social, political and cultural activity?

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

SOCI 3140  Veterans War & Society  (4 Credits)  

This course examines the impact of war and military culture on returning combat veterans, their families and communities. Topics include domestic violence, addiction, suicide, homelessness, mental illness and unemployment. Students will have the opportunity to consider social policies, advocacy agendas, community resources and intervention strategies to support military families.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3145  Violence: Systems & Solutions  (4 Credits)  

Although many of us have grudgingly come to accept violence as an inevitable and almost 'natural' part of our everyday lives, we struggle with developing some understanding of why violence happens and what to we can do about it. This study is intended to explore the multitude of theories about the causes of violence, how violence manifests in today's world, and to think creatively about mechanisms for addressing violence. Specifically, this study will critically examine the following issues: 1. What is violence? What does it mean to say that violence is 'socially constructed?' How is violence measured by government agencies? 2. What are the differences and similarities between individual violence, collective violence and state sponsored violence? How is violence produced by social systems? 3. What are the strengths and weaknesses of the various theories for understanding violence? 4. What approaches have been used to address various forms of violence? Have they been effective? Can we envision new and innovative approaches to addressing violence? Prerequisites: introductory sociology, psychology and/or criminal justice studies; OR comparable prior learning Studies in other disciplines such as history, psychology, sociology, etc. will enhance the learning in this study.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3150  Youth in Society  (4 Credits)  

Drawing from sociology, history, anthropology and critical social theories, this course focuses on the historical and structural position of youth as 'the minority of minorities'. With and emphasis on U.S. culture and society, theoretical and historical perspectives will be examined, including the relationship of young people to adult authority and social institutions. Students will have the opportunity to study youth and society in current affairs.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3155  Youth Community & Culture  (4 Credits)  

This course evaluates the role of culture and community in young people's lives, and their impact on relationships with peers, power, authority and institutions. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate selected youth subcultures, locally and globally.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 3996  Special Topics in SOCI  (2-8 Credits)  
SOCI 3998  Individualized Studies in Sociology (SOCI)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Sociology (SOCI). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

SOCI 4005  Coastal Community Studies  (4 Credits)  

This course focuses on the impact of climate change, gentrification, social inequality, and economics on coastal communities, locally and globally. Critical Issues faced by historical and contemporary coastal communities will be evaluated.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 4010  Community Studies  (4 Credits)  

The goal of this course is to research the meaning, structure, scope, and creation of community through empirical investigation and analysis. As part of this course, students will conduct research within a community of their own choosing. Virtual, physical, geographical or historical communities may be selected for examination.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 4015  Cultural & Social Trauma  (4 Credits)  

Collective or cultural trauma is the cultural and social impacts of violent or an otherwise shocking event by a distinct cultural or ethnic group of people. Cultural trauma and its effects are complex, multigenerational and cumulative, and can be felt and across generations. The goal of this course is to explore the causes, dynamics, and social and political implications of these complex social phenomena.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 4025  Popular Music in American Society  (4 Credits)  

This course examines popular music in terms of the creative process, production and consumption of music, the relationship between the artist, the fan, and the socio-historical context. Students will have the opportunity to select musical forms for analysis through qualitative methods of social science such as participant-observation, ethnography, and content analysis. Theoretical perspectives on the meaning of 'popular' will be applied to the study of popular forms and cultural formations.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 4030  Power & Privilege  (4 Credits)  

Social identity is a complex process in which intersecting points of power, privilege, and oppression contribute to how people see themselves and how they see others. This course focuses on the United States and examines how power, privilege, and oppression are defined and advanced by social institutions (e.g. the family, education, legal system, etc.) and how they shape social identity. Students will also examine how these issues influence relationships, experiences, expectations and opportunities. Prerequisites: Introductory Sociology and/or one additional social science, human development, CHS and/or public affairs study related to the topics of this course This course was previously SOC-284264 Power and Privilege.

Attributes: Liberal

SOCI 4035  Privacy Security & Freedom: Social Concerns for the 21st Century  (4 Credits)  

The sociological and philosophical exploration of the questions of privacy, security and freedom in the 21st Century in the context of both the theory and practical, policy-oriented aspects of these social concerns. This study will include an examination of some of the concepts of political and social philosophy, such as private vs. public domains, the individual and the state, freedom, political obligation and their relevance to contemporary society and government, with a particular focus on the Patriot Act, the Homeland Security Act, and current events shaping privacy and security legislation. Prerequisites: Advanced Level Standing This course was previously SOC-283274 Privacy, Security & Freedom.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

SOCI 4045  Visual Sociology  (4 Credits)  

Visual sociology is the examination of social life through the analysis of visual artifacts. This course explores how visual theories and methodologies are used for sociological inquiry. Students will explore how visual images and artifacts represent and interpret social phenomena, social issues/problems, and social change.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

SOCI 4998  Individualized Studies in Sociology (SOCI)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Sociology (SOCI). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.