PHIL: Philosophy (Undergraduate)

PHIL 1998  Individualized Studies in Philosophy (PHIL)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Philosophy (PHIL). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

PHIL 2005  An Introduction to Philosophy  (4 Credits)  

Learn about some of (primarily Western) philosophy's major concepts, questions, and figures. Examples of such questions might include: Can we distinguish right from wrong? (How?) Does God exist? What is real? Should we consider scientific knowledge to be truth? This course was previously CUL-222224 An Introduction to Philosophy.

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

PHIL 2010  Environmental Ethics: Introductory  (4 Credits)  

This study will examine the relationship between human beings and the natural world through the framework of leading ethical theories and non-Western perspectives, for the purpose of understanding our place in nature; the value, and possibly rights, of the natural environment (animals, plants, species, ecosystems); and the extent and justification of our moral obligations to the environment and to future generations.

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

PHIL 2020  Introduction to Ethics  (4 Credits)  

Learn about some of the ways that ethicists reason about such topics as 'good and bad' or 'right and wrong' or 'morality' in a range of contexts. NOTE: Students should not take both the 4-credit and the 2-credit courses titled Introduction to Ethics as these overlap. This course was previously CUL-222244 Introduction to Ethics (2-4cr).

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

PHIL 2030  Social Ethics  (4 Credits)  

Social Ethics is an examination of the basic problems of moral philosophy in the context of the major moral controversies in the contemporary world. The main focus of the course will include ethical analysis and its application to such issues as abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, justice and social welfare, racial and sexual discrimination, same-sex marriage, sexual morality, and the environment. The purpose of this course is to provide students the opportunity to develop a solid academic foundation in the current state of the literature in relation to the pressing ethical dilemmas that animate our public discourse.

Attributes: Liberal

PHIL 2996  Special Topics in Philosphy  (4 Credits)  

This is a course about special topics in philosophy.

Attributes: Liberal

PHIL 2998  Individualized Studies in Philosophy (PHIL)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Philosophy (PHIL). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

PHIL 3005  Asian Worldviews  (4 Credits)  

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the means to develop a sound understanding of the distinct types of thought found in Asia. The student will develop familiarity with core Asian concepts, principles and methods of analysis. Philosophical doctrines and major themes will be examined. The philosophical underpinnings of Asian philosophy will be assessed in order to provide the student with the tools necessary to do scholarly critical evaluation. The goal of the course is to enable the student to achieve a high degree of conceptual mastery in the foundations of Asian philosophy anchored on a solid textual foundation.

Attributes: Liberal

PHIL 3010  Meditation & Mindfulness  (4 Credits)  

The purpose of this course is to facilitate the development of comprehensive understanding of meditation and mindfulness practice. We will explore scientific, theoretical, and practical aspects of meditation by studying interdisciplinary and multicultural ways of understanding the mind and human consciousness along with some traditional meditation practices. We will also examine the history and philosophy of meditation and assess the evidence for how and why these practices can enhance well-being, self-care skills, and genuine compassion for others.

Attributes: Liberal

PHIL 3015  Thinking About Music  (4 Credits)  

What is music and why does it matter? How and why do different music's matter differently to different people, and powerfully so? How might our own experiences with listening to music or making music inform our understanding of music's relevance to and importance in human life and culture? In this course, students will read, think, and write about music in philosophical ways, with ample opportunity to shape questions, ideas, and arguments in relation to their own musical experiences, interests, and preferences.

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

PHIL 3100  Environmental Ethics: Advanced  (4 Credits)  

What is the value of nature and how do we measure it? Do we have moral obligations toward the natural world and toward future generations? How do we determine these obligations? Environmental ethics considers these questions through various philosophical approaches that examine our relationship with the natural world. Students will read foundational and contemporary texts on topics including environmental degradation, social justice, world hunger, animal welfare, climate change, and the decline of biodiversity.

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

PHIL 3998  Individualized Studies in Philosophy (PHIL)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Philosophy (PHIL). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

PHIL 4015  Social/Political Philosophy  (4 Credits)  

This contract is a study of the foundational texts and principal problems in Social/Political Philosophy. The student will read primary source material. Starting with Thomas Hobbes and working up to the contemporary literature, the student will explore, examine and probe diverse theories designed to answer questions regarding the role of government; government's limits and responsibilities; the rights and obligations of the citizen; the nature of law; the concept of justice; property rights; the scope and limits of individual liberty; and when and how the government may legitimately limit and restrict individual liberty.

Attributes: Liberal

PHIL 4998  Individualized Studies in Philosophy (PHIL)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Philosophy (PHIL). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.