LABR: Labor Studies (Undergraduate)

LABR 1010  Class Race & Gender for Workers  (4 Credits)  

Our identity is influenced by how we look at ourselves-as men and women, as working or middle class, as white or black or some other racial and/or ethnic mix, as a citizen or an 'illegal' immigrant. It is also shaped by the way society perceives us, puts us into certain groups. Indeed, since they often build off existing patterns of economic, social and political inequality, these broader social perceptions shape our opportunities for a full life. This course explores the interaction between our individual lives and broader historical process and structural patterns. In doing so, students delve into the 'problem of solidarity.' Unionists know that solidarity is the basis for strength. However, it is not something that can be taken for granted. It is an imaginative process, an active intellectual struggle, in which working men and women of all backgrounds discover and re-discover common ground. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 1020  Global Civilizations: Workers' Perspectives  (4 Credits)  

This course offers an introductory but also systematic study of world history-the story of human habitation and human diversity from earliest times to the present. Too often, world history is told as if each society or nation-state or region functioned as a discrete political, economic and cultural unit, its success or failure over time determined by some inherent strength or weakness. In this class the goal is to explore different perspectives. We will examine how environmental circumstances gave some societies advantages that others lacked. Students also will also study the hows and whys of the rise and fall of regional civilizations by paying close attention to the connections-created by trade, conquest, and the exploitation of nature and labor-between these civilizations. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Other World Civilization Gn Ed, Liberal

LABR 1025  Women and the Economy  (4 Credits)  

Increasing inequality is the most severe it has ever been and it effects all aspects of our lives - our jobs, wages, hours of work, the education and health of our children and families, and the kinds of help we can expect from our government. All women, but especially immigrant and women of color, are experiencing this economic reality in particular ways. In this course we will look at the economic transformation in women’s lives -- more women are supporting their families, more women work in the growing service sector which tends to have the lowest paying jobs, more work that used to be done in the home-care for children and the elderly - is being relegated to the market. While some women have made tremendous economic strides most women are still struggling. We need to have an accurate understanding of women’s economic and political realities in order to have an impact on public policy and on the kind of society we envision for our families. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 1030  Labor & Management in the Pipe Trades  (4 Credits)  

This course explores the history, present circumstances and possible futures of workplace relations in the pipe trades. Issues are examined from the perspectives of both labor and management and union and non-union. The course looks at the diversity of work settings and practices in the industry, as well as the changing nature of the workforce and the circumstances faced by contractors and journey workers. It also explores the role of education in developing the new workforce and in providing leaders for different sectors of the industry Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 1035  Labor & Public Affairs  (4 Credits)  

This course is designed to help students develop their research, written and oral communication skills as they learn about current economic, political and social issues important for working people. The guiding context for this course is how the winners in our economic system have come to thoroughly dominate our politics, exacerbating both the economic gap between the wealthy and the rest, and the political gap between what the majority of the public-the working and middle classes-want from their political system and what they actually get. As we read though the texts and articles, we will discuss the main themes, understand the arguments, and grasp the empirical evidence presented in preparation for student’s choosing a topic and presenting it to their peers. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 1040  Labor & the Economy  (4 Credits)  

This course provides students with the tools that are necessary for understanding the economy in general and the economic conditions of an industry such as the construction industry. What is economic efficiency and when is a particular market, either a labor market or the market for a specific product, efficient? Is it true that everything depends upon 'supply and demand'? If so, how are supply and demand determined? How are prices, wages and profits determined? Why is full employment not ever permanent? The course also provides the tools required to analyze the proper role of the government and the effect of its finances on the economy in general and on the construction industry in particular. The effects of labor laws (e.g., minimum wage, unemployment insurance, and 'right to work' laws), the provision of governmental services (e.g., public transportation, schools, infrastructure), and of full-employment policies on the economy in general and on the conditions of workers and management in the construction in industry in particular are examined. The issues involved with taxation by the different levels of government are also explored. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 1050  Literature & Society for Workers  (4 Credits)  

'Literature and Society' provides an opportunity to read novels, poems, and plays about the experiences of working people, and the dramatic situations that their work can create for them. The texts discussed in this course are chosen for the unique stories they tell about individuals attempting to improve their own living situations, and the challenges they face from friends, enemies and the social structures around them. It allows students to consider the struggles of (primarily) fictional characters and the efforts required to bring resolution to their personal challenges. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 1055  Art & Social Practice for Paraprofessionals  (4 Credits)  

Social Practice describes a conversation between the arts and the social sciences and an engagement in the creative process in ways that are relevant to students' lives as workers and citizens. People who are a part of this conversation can be practitioners educated in, inspired by, or who adopt methods, ideas and attitudes from conventional and historical art forms. They then use these artistic approaches to address major questions in social life or to affect it in a variety of ways. This first practitioner makes an art out of being social. Or, secondly, it can describe practitioners who are educated in, inspired by, or who adopt methods, ideas and attitudes from the social sciences. Thus, Social Practice is an experiment, which could begin with asking a series of questions. These questions are answered in many different ways, using our thoughts, our actions and a variety of materials. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability.

Attributes: Arts Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 1065  College Reading for Workers  (4 Credits)  

This course is designed to build students' reading ability, confidence and fluency--to help them get through texts that are challenging or boring, to help them read more quickly, and to learn strategies to help them read with the analytic eye that instructors expect. All reading texts are labor-centric, providing students with the opportunity to think about, reflect on, and discuss the values of trade unionists. The meaning of labor and work will be explored through texts that challenge students in a variety of ways. Students will become adept at reading labor texts in order to prepare them for ensuing labor courses. This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 1070  College Writing for Workers  (4 Credits)  

This course provides students with the opportunity to spend a semester working intensively on their writing and writing process, while reflecting on the values of being a trade unionist. Students will use writing as a meaning-making tool, will increase their written fluency, and will be engaged in all stages of the writing process. Texts to be read, reflected and written about will cover what it means to take pride in one’s work, as well as the worth of being a skilled craftsperson. In reading, writing and class discussions, students will be engaged in thinking reflectively and critically about the nature of work. While there is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, this is primarily a writing course. This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class through the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Basic Communication Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 1105  Workers/Artists  (4 Credits)  

This study and workshop is primarily concerned with the evolution of contemporary forms of representation through various mediums with particular focus on themes relevant to the worker. The study of art works in a variety of media that engage subject matter such as economic inclusion, environmental justice, and gender and racial equality in intersection with Labor will culminate in the creation of the student’s own creative project(s). The mediums will be explored as powerful tools of communication as well as vehicles for personal and collective worker expression. The option of special focus on one principal medium in depth may exist, both as on object of study and as a creative process to employ in one’s own final art project and maybe offered in concert with the expertise of the instructor. This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class through the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Arts Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 1123  Labor Relations in Public Education  (3 Credits)  

This course provides an overview of the rise of collective bargaining in public education, primarily in New York City and New York State, but also nationally. It focuses; in particular, on the effect unionization and collective bargaining have on students, teachers, administrators and school systems. In addition to examining existing models of unionization, students also consider alternative forms of work organization and “stakeholder relations” in schools, which proponents claim will encourage continued improvement in the schools and be increasingly relevant to the emerging ‘knowledge economy’.

LABR 1137  Introduction to College Learning  (3 Credits)  

This course introduces students to the purposes, character and history of post-secondary education in the United States, particularly from the standpoint of the working adults. What does it mean to be college educated? What does one have to do in order to acquire college level learning? The course helps prepare students to succeed in their college experience.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 1150  History of Public Education  (4 Credits)  

This course provides an overview of the struggle for public education in the United States from the 18th century to the present. This struggle has been the means by which new groups – wage earners, slaves, women, immigrants and others–pursued and won inclusion into an expanded (and still expanding) body of citizens in the US. By insisting upon and gaining access to public education, they helped secure their own claims to equality and created new opportunities for advancement for themselves and their descendants. The nature and effect of these struggles, the education opportunities created and lost, as well as the challenges we face educating the next generation of citizens, are central concerns of this course.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 1152  Women’s Studies: Economics of the Female Body  (3 Credits)  

In this course students will develop an understanding of how women's bodies are evaluated in society across various cultures, religions, work, the economy, race, age, class, sexuality, education and other variables. Students will examine female autonomy, single and married roles involved in motherhood, house work vs. work outside of the home, myths about female labor, facts about salary differences between men and women in the twenty-first century, female activism in the United States and other factors that affect women's lives based on social values or the lack thereof for and of the female body.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 1153  Introduction to Exceptionalities  (3 Credits)  

This course provides an overview of the education of children and youth with exceptionalities, focusing on those with disabilities and giftedness. Among the areas covered are: a review of the historical, legal and philosophical foundations of special education and other exceptionalities; definitions of exceptionalities and their prevalence, causes and characteristics. In addition, the course examines current issues and trends in regard to how and where these children are educated. A variety of teaching strategies are used including lecture and discussion, large and small group structured learning activities and journal writing. Wherever possible, participants demonstrate the application of course content to classroom situations.

LABR 1162  Introduction to College Learning  (3 Credits)  

This course introduces students to the purposes, character and history of post-secondary education in the United States, particularly from the standpoint of the working adults. What does it mean to be college-educated? What does one have to do in order to acquire college-level learning? The course helps prepare students to succeed in their college experience.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 1167  Labor and the Economy for Paraprofessionals  (3 Credits)  

This course covers the basics of economics. Some of the topics explored are: What is economic efficiency and how can it be enhanced?; How are wages and profits determined; What is the role of government and what is the efficient level of taxes? Implications for education and education policy are explored throughout. The course is designed for students with an interest, though not necessarily a background, in economics. It does not use mathematics, although some basic arithmetic will come into play. The aim of the course is to give the student a thorough understanding of the key concepts and theories of different schools of economics and to better understand how these concepts relate specifically to their lives and the lives of their family members. In each case, the history of economic thought will be traced, along with the historical context of the ideas involved.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 1177  Introduction to Early Childhood Education for Paraprofessionals  (3 Credits)  

This study provides an introduction to the field of early childhood education, including historical foundations, educational philosophies, basic child development strategies, and skills such as observing and recording behaviors and using developmentally appropriate practices.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 1207  Introduction to Computers  (3 Credits)  

This course will provide students with a solid understanding of the functions and applications of the computer as a tool for college work. Topics will include key hardware components of the computer and their functions; how to manage files effectively; key software tools including Microsoft Word, Excel, and Power Point; the computer as a communications tool, email, the internet and social networking; and maintaining computer security.

LABR 1996  Special Topics in Labr  (2-8 Credits)  
LABR 1997  Speical topics in LABR  (2-8 Credits)  
LABR 1998  Individualized Studies in Labor (LABR)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Labor (LABR). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

LABR 2005  International Labor Issues  (4 Credits)  

Examine the issues facing employees, unions and employers as a consequence of operating in the context of the global economy and an economic environment characterized by competition, emphasis upon quality and the formation of new and more participatory relationships in the private and public sector workplace and beyond. Examine international comparisons of wages, education and training strategies, workplace representation and the roles of the social safety net and labor laws in economic and social development. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered online. This course was previously LAB-262724 International Labor Issues.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 2010  US History from 1776 to the Present: Workers' Perspectives  (4 Credits)  

The course introduces students to examine American history through the struggles and victories of American workers. The American Revolution, the Civil War, Immigration and the Creation of the Working Class and the post-World War II era are the four key sections in history that will be examined. Working with primary documents, scholarly articles, and handouts, students explore the consequences and contested meaning of key episodes paying special attention to the role of working people in the development of the relative prosperity of the economy and the democratic inspiration of the country’s governing institutions. Students will also gain an understanding of how US workers and their institutions fit in with broader shifts in the national and international political economy. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: American History Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 2122  Educational Planning for Labor Studies  (5 Credits)  

The purpose of Educational Planning for Labor Studies is for each student to design and complete a degree program that will 1) fulfill the College’s degree requirements, and, 2) allow the choosing of degree-related courses of interest. Students have the option of choosing to pursue a bachelor’s degree in labor studies or enroll in the 20-credit program. Students will develop their educational plans in the context of investigating trade unions as collective organizations, fundamental to a democratic society. The course asks students to consider and discuss the challenges working people and union members face in today’s economy and the role of the critical/intellectual "skills" that one acquires through a liberal arts based college education in meeting these challenges. Within this context, the course asks students to consider and discuss the purpose and role of a college education - particularly for working people and union members.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 2998  Individualized Studies in Labor (LABR)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Labor (LABR). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

LABR 3005  Collective Bargaining  (4 Credits)  

In the Collective Bargaining course, we will study the roles of all of the participants in the proceedings- both union and management, and the roles of those in authority they are responsible to, the bargaining committee’s responsibility to their constituents, and what kind of effect those constituents can have on the outcome of bargaining. Among the topics that will be explored will be the law as it effects the bargaining process, the duty to bargain, different tactics in bargaining, impasses, strike, and lockouts, management rights, union rights and responsibilities, costing out of contracts, the mediation and arbitration processes, dispute resolution procedure, basic labor law, and the history of labor unions in this country. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3010  Contemporary Labor Issues: Immigration  (4 Credits)  

This course examines the social and political phenomena of migration and borders, tracing how they impact workers, labor markets, and policy discussions of how to solve the “problem” of immigration. We will challenge the popular idea that immigrants are the problem by unpacking assumptions about immigration dynamics, undocumented workers, and the economics of immigration, in order to move toward a framework that examines this immigration system and limited rights & labor protections as the root issues. We will place these issues in historical and contemporary context, looking at both the evolution of immigration controls and how they are experienced by migrants. We will then assess recent literature that presents possible solutions, and explore whether such proposals hold the potential to break away from the current deadlock and transform a system that enables exploitation. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3015  Critical Labor Issues  (4 Credits)  

The trade union movement in the United States originated during the early years of the republic. As in other counties, skilled workers were the first to organize and form unions. From 1880 to 1950 union membership grew to an all-time high, representing over one-third of the workforce. While today roughly 32 percent of the public sector workforce is unionized, in the private sector union density is at 6.7 per cent, leaving total density at just over 11 percent. This course examines the key forces, facts, figures, institutions, and individuals that help explain the rise and decline of U.S. unionization. The course also looks at recent working-class campaigns and organizing efforts with an eye towards a roadmap for a rejuvenated labor movement. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3020  Development of the Labor Movement  (4 Credits)  

of The American Labor Movement was directly or partially responsible for enormous changes in American society in the twentieth century. Unions raised the wages, improved the living standards and increased the opportunities for millions of workers and their families. Unions negotiated the first paid vacation benefits, health insurance and pensions for workers. Nonunion employers still offer these benefits to keep up with demands made by unions elsewhere. Unions helped build the New Deal welfare state of the 1930s that included social security, minimum wages and the elimination of child labor. Unions lobbied for public housing and higher education. Many unions supported the Civil Rights movement and other social justice causes, and struggled to protect workers in the face of sweeping changes in the national and international political economy. Indeed, to study the US labor movement is not just to study union organizing, collective bargaining, and labor legislation. This is a study of how it has impacted the way workers lived their lives, and how it has shaped role the working class played in both an American and a global setting. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: American History Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3025  Diversity in the Workplace in the Construction Industry  (4 Credits)  

The dynamics and makeup of our workplaces, communities, industry, and union are rapidly changing. How a culture is constructed, defined, and perceived has a powerful and lasting impact on the future of electrical work and trade unions. Drawing from fiction, published reports, scholarly journals, guest speakers, discussions and films, this class will analyze the impacts and dynamics of culture - of race, gender, orientation, nationality and power at work. How is culture constructed at the workplace, in your union and community? What are the costs of defining who is 'in'? What have unions done to respond to changing social dynamics and what are the bedrock principles of solidarity leading us forward? Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3027  Labor by the Numbers  (4 Credits)  

The course will help you gain an understanding of some basic statistics and economic concepts and how to use these to formulate and evaluate current economic arguments for the purpose of strengthening your economic literacy. We are inundated with statistical data – in our newspapers, on television, in advertising; it affects our opinions, our decisions, and our choices, often in subtle ways. It is important for us as informed citizens to understand current economic and political realities so that we can choose policies that will support the kind of society we envision for ourselves and our families. We will situate our data and statistical models within the context of analyzing some of the causes and effects of inequality, identified by many economists as the most important economic problem facing working people. This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class through the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Mathematics Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3035  Educational Planning for Labor Studies  (4 Credits)  

The purpose of Educational Planning for Labor Studies is for each student to design and complete a degree program that will 1) fulfill the College’s degree requirements, and, 2) allow the choosing of degree-related courses of interest. Students have the option of choosing to pursue a bachelor’s degree in labor studies or enroll in the 20-credit program. Students will develop their educational plans in the context of investigating trade unions as collective organizations, fundamental to a democratic society. The course asks students to consider and discuss the challenges working people and union members face in today’s economy and the role of the critical/intellectual 'skills' that one acquires through a liberal arts based college education in meeting these challenges. Within this context, the course asks students to consider and discuss the purpose and role of a college education - particularly for working people and union members. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3040  Estimating in the Construction Industry  (4 Credits)  

It is often said that 'Cost estimating is an art, not a science' - and that there is legitimate disagreement as to what constitutes reasonable costs even when plans, specifications, site, and labor and material costs are identical for all bidders. This course introduces students to estimating for the general construction trades, as well as to the review of construction procedures and trade practices. Students examine management techniques from the standpoint of bid preparation, take-off, and bid submissions. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

LABR 3042  Education & Social Progress  (4 Credits)  

This class will examine different educational philosophies as they might effect different groups of working people in different circumstances and social structures. The readings will look at the role of workers' education in organized labor, a college prison program, and in a reconceptualization of the content of "blue-collar" work. All education, of course, promotes personal growth and transformation; however, we will examine the idea that worker's education, rooted in working class experiences and struggles, is essential for imagining and acting on the kind of society we want for ourselves and our families -- indeed, for a more robust labor movement and a more democratic society. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3047  Occupations Safety & Health & the Environment  (4 Credits)  

This course enables students to gain an understanding of the hazardous conditions that workers face on the job, various occupational safety and health regulations, and the relationship between the workplace and the environment, particularly climate change. Thousands of workers die each year while working; communities are effected by toxins leaking into the air and into water supplies and changing our overall climate. Workers on the job face bullying, inappropriate behavior and other types of discrimination that create unsafe working environments. Are current local, state and federal laws adequate for protecting workers, their families and our communities? What are some solutions for making our working conditions and our communities safer and what role can trade unions play? This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3050  Issues in Public Art: Representation of Workers  (4 Credits)  

This study is primarily concerned with contemporary public art primarily in New York City with some focus on works made for the worker and/or a working class consciousness either through studying the work of others or by the creation of the student’s own creative project. The assigned readings and presentations introduce the complex relationship between aesthetics and the development and life of the city in public art, and its ever-changing relationship with architecture and urban planning. Students will consider issues such as the importance of the role of art and artists in society, how public art addresses-- or is addressed-- by issues of race, class, and gender. We shall also study the hierarchical relationships between craft and art and how the student’s own electricians trade might be considered or reconsidered. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Arts Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3055  Labor Economics  (4 Credits)  

This course provides an economic analysis of the market for workers (the labor market). Students will analyze the determinants of labor supply and labor demand. Topics include educational and training investments, occupational choice, worker mobility, pay and productivity, wage structure, income inequality and policy issues such as labor shortages, the effects of minimum wage on employment, the labor effects of outsourcing, economic analysis of unemployment, the impact of welfare policy on labor supply and demand and the role of unions. Students will examine additional topics that may vary across terms. Additional topics may include gender wage differentials, economics of marriage and divorce, demographic trends and economic issues related to occupational health and safety, changes in levels of unionization and immigration. Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Microeconomics, or equivalent Notes: This course is offered online. This course is also listed as ECON 3045 Economics of Labor Markets. Students should not enroll in both ECON 3045 and LABR 3055. This course was previously LAB-263714 Labor Economics.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3060  Labor Law  (4 Credits)  

This course will provide a thorough overview of the laws governing labor and employment relations with an emphasis on private sector unions. the purpose of the course is to (a) familiarize students with an array of laws affecting the workplace and worker rights, and (b) develop your understanding of how these legal concepts are practiced in the real world. the goal of the course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the relevant laws as well as the necessary legal skills to work effectively as an employee and union member. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3065  Union Leadership & Administration  (4 Credits)  

Today the power of unions is challenged by growing inequality, globalization, emerging technologies as well as changes in the law and in the structure of industries and work. These developments have spawned demands for stronger, more visionary leadership in unions. Drawing on a variety of social science and historic research, this course applies leadership and organizational theories to a union context in order to examine and analyze the leadership models, practices, and approaches we find in contemporary unions that lead to successful democratic unions. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3070  Labor Management Relations  (4 Credits)  

This study explores the nature, determinants and socioeconomic impact of collective bargaining and labor-management relations in the United States. Some of the topics students will explore include the historical development of the labor movement, union structure and administration, the collective bargaining process, the settlement of labor-management disputes, and administration of the contract. This course is also listed as HRMS 3030 Labor Management Relations for Business. Students should not enroll in both LABR 3070 and HRMS 3030. This course was previously BME-213654 Labor/Management Relations. Prerequisites: Principles of Management or equivalent Corequisites: None This course is offered online.

LABR 3072  United States Labor History  (4 Credits)  

This course examines the roles of workers and their organizations from colonial American times to the present. The goals are to develop informed and critical analyses of these historical developments and to draw conclusions about them in ways that make sense to the student. Students will critically examine and discuss labor as a form of economic, political, and social expression; will learn how to identify, understand, and appreciate labor traditions in their historical, critical, and socio-cultural contexts; and will learn to differentiate economic, political, social, and organizational traditions. The course will also consider the manner in which both unionized and non-unionized work developed. This will include discussing how gender, race, and ethnicity have influenced workers in America. Course activities require students to observe, discuss and write about labor from critical and analytical perspectives, including cultural, historical, sociological, political, and philosophical frameworks. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course fulfills SUNY American History General Education Requirements. This course is offered online. This course was previously LAB-263704 United States Labor History.

Attributes: American History Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3075  Labor Relations in Construction  (4 Credits)  

This course examines the development of workplace relations in the building trades from both a union and nonunion perspective. It familiarizes the student with an array of laws affecting the construction workplace, as well as the jurisdictional issues that frame the obligations of labor unions in the building trades and shape the realities they face. Students will also examine the complexities of labor-management cooperation on the job, the process of negotiations between labor and management, and the impact of labor organizing. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3080  Labor & Politics  (4 Credits)  

In this course, students will explore the role of Labor in the political process of the U.S. both historically and what’s happening today. Students will be required to engage in and work with a campaign - for a candidate running for either local or national office, or a campaign for a referendum question. Topics covered in the course will include: the presidential electoral process, the issues and arguments in this campaign cycle, what should Labor seek from candidates, the relationship between the Democrats and Labor, the role of volunteerism in a campaign, and how campaigns fit into the future of the Labor Movement Labor in this country. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3085  Labor & the Global Workplace  (4 Credits)  

Globalization' is a term that we hear or read about almost everyday in the media. Some say globalization is inevitable and good for the economy and should be encouraged; others say globalization is detrimental to society and must be controlled. 'Labor and the Global Workplace' will explore a variety of basic questions that surround this debate: What exactly is globalization? What are the causes of globalization? Is globalization beneficial or detrimental for working people? How do we see the future of globalization? What should labor’s response be to globalization? Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3090  Labor & the Sociological Imagination  (4 Credits)  

In this course we will explore what it means for workers to think and see like a sociologist. The foundational text is C.W. Mills’ classic from 1959, The Sociological Imagination, which still resonates as a call for a publicly engaged and relevant form of social science research. At the center of our work will be Mills’ insistence the 'neither the life of an individual nor the history of a society can be understood without understanding both.' More specifically, we examine how what Mills referred to as 'troubles,' those matters which impact private individuals and those immediately around them, can also be understood as 'issues,' those matters of public concern which impact a much broader range and require public rather private solutions. In addition to Mills, we study examples from public opinion research, ethnography, and journalism for methodological guidance as students plan and conduct research projects that develop their own 'sociological imagination'. This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3095  Our World Trade Centers  (4 Credits)  

The course focuses on the planning and building of two generations of the World Trade Center: the original twin towers and the new Freedom Tower complex. How did these extraordinary feats of engineering and construction grow out of Lower Manhattan, once a great port and epicenter of global finance? And what can these towers - built on a site where natural forces and human conflict repeatedly intersect - tell us about the history and possible futures of the city our labor makes real? Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3100  Principles of Trade Unionism  (4 Credits)  

There are two schools of thought about trade unions. Some see them as necessary organizations of wage earners that help make our society work better. Others see them as illegitimate 'monopolies' or 'special interests' that benefit their members at the expense of the general public. In this course students learn what unions are, how they operate, who organizes them and why, and what they are doing (or propose to do) to make sure that the United States remains a great place to live-for everyone! Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3102  We Built This City: Rebuilding Working Class New York  (4 Credits)  

To work in New York City’s building trades today is to build a city that workers cannot afford to live in. But it was not always this way, and it doesn’t have to stay this way. Through readings, group and independent research, and guest speakers, this class will explore the question of how New York City became such an expensive city to live in, and how we can rebuild New York as a city for workers. Throughout, we will look at how the housing development in New York City has articulated with race, class, and gender, and how social movements seeking to counter systemic oppression have engaged with housing. We will begin our inquiry with a look at the context of development in New York City from the postwar era to the present day with presentations from subject experts and a selection of readings, followed by group projects focusing on the “Four L’s” of development: laws, land, labor, and loans. Students will then use the knowledge they gain to create a plan for a housing development project at a specific site in New York City. This course provides students with the opportunity to learn and apply research skills to the housing development process in New York City, illuminating the political-economic and social forces that shape housing– a crucial aspect of students’ daily lives.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3105  Project Management for Construction  (4 Credits)  

Project management is the overall planning, co-ordination and control of a project from inception to completion aimed at meeting a client's requirements in order to produce a functionally and financially viable project that will be completed on time within authorized cost and to the required quality standards. Project management is the process by which a project is brought to a successful conclusion. The purpose of project management is to manage and to ensure the most efficient way of utilization of limited resources (budget, time, labor, material, etc.) such that the output would be maximized. Construction project management (CPM) is project management that applies to the construction sector. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

LABR 3110  Public Sector Labor Relations  (4 Credits)  

In this course, students will examine public sector labor relations and the key similarities and differences between private sector and public sector labor relations. Students will study the historical development of public sector labor relations to better understand the current environment in which it exists. Students will analyze the connections among culture, law, work environment, economics, politics, and personalities and how these factors enhance and/or impeding public sector labor relations. Students will have the opportunity to examine these issues in particular sectors such as health care, education, and the protective services. Finally, students will assess and discuss the positive and negative ramifications of changes in labor relations for public sector workers, unions, and the employers with whom they interact. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered online. This course was previously BME-213664. LABR 3110 is cross listed with HRMS 3110.

Cross-listed with HRMS 3110.

LABR 3115  The Global Workplace  (4 Credits)  

Explore the interrelationships among global economic competition, technological change and resulting structures of corporate and workplace arrangements, innovations in labor-management relations and programs of worker participation. Consider both the promise and the problems which economic forces represent for corporations, labor, work and society. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered online. This course was previously LAB-263724 The Global Workplace: Its Impact on Employers.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3120  The Political Economy of New York City: Workers' Perspectives  (4 Credits)  

This course examines New York City’s economy and the role of politics in directing its growth and distributing its rewards. Its hinge is the Fiscal Crisis of 1975, an event that marked a dramatic shift in the way city government planned for economic growth, interacted with the private sector, and served the people of New York. More specifically, course readings, brief lectures and class discussions will focus on the forces that have shaped life in the city before, during, and after the Fiscal Crisis: the labor movement; public sector institutions; the real estate industry; a widening gap between rich and poor; the privatization of public services. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3122  Educational Planning for Labor Studies  (5 Credits)  

The purpose of Educational Planning for Labor Studies is for each student to design and complete a degree program that will 1) fulfill the College’s degree requirements, and, 2) allow the choosing of degree-related courses of interest. Students have the option of choosing to pursue a bachelor’s degree in labor studies or enroll in the 20-credit program. Students will develop their educational plans in the context of investigating trade unions as collective organizations, fundamental to a democratic society. The course asks students to consider and discuss the challenges working people and union members face in today’s economy and the role of the critical/intellectual "skills" that one acquires through a liberal arts based college education in meeting these challenges. Within this context, the course asks students to consider and discuss the purpose and role of a college education - particularly for working people and union members. This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3125  Theories of the Labor Movement  (4 Credits)  

The objective of this course is to understand the origin, nature, and future of the U.S. labor movement through different theoretical lenses and comparative approaches. The course analyzes the role played by trade unions in American society and explores the historical and institutional factors that have shaped the U.S. labor movement. The course also introduces contemporary debates on the economic and political challenges facing American trade unions and the potential solutions to revive the labor movement. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3127  Labor and the Middle East  (4 Credits)  

This course will offer a unique perspective on the history of the Modern Middle East. Most overviews of the region focus on a narrative of religious or cultural conflict, while leaving out or marginalizing processes of political and economic development, including the complex role played by labor and the working classes of the region. Here students will critically assess the political, economic and cultural history of the modern Middle East. And by placing labor at the center of that history, students will gain an appreciation for what connects their own experience as trade unionists and workers with that of the unionists and workers of the Middle East. This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3130  Women the Economy & the Trades  (4 Credits)  

The guiding focus of this course is to understand why reforms and responses in the workplace are needed that address the economic and familial needs of working people. The course will explore why family-related needs should not be viewed as the individual and personal problems of workers - primarily women - but be folded into a wider economic context addressed by social policies. The majority of women continue to work in a small number of occupations, typically lower-paid; and the percent of women working in the trades has not increased significantly in a decade. The course will explore why job segregation and family needs being labeled as 'women’s issues' are related and why they can be located within women’s and men’s historical role in the family. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3132  Child Abuse Neglect and Family Violence  (3 Credits)  

This course examines theory and research related to child abuse, neglect and family violence. Socio-cultural influences on the incidence of family violence and its consequences will be explored. This course will also address multi disciplinary approaches to intervention and prevention. Note: This is a blended class and a significant portion of the work will be done online.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed

LABR 3133  Struggles & Victories Workers in America: A Four Section Survey of US History from 1776 to Present  (4 Credits)  

The course introduces students to examine American history through the struggles and victories of American workers. The American Revolution, the Civil War, the New Deal and the post-World War II era are the four key turning periods in history that will be examined. Working with primary documents, scholarly articles, and handouts, students explore the consequences and contested meaning of key episodes paying special attention to the role of working people in the development of the relative prosperity of the economy and the democratic inspiration of the country’s governing institutions.

Attributes: American History Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3135  Working-class Themes in Literature  (4 Credits)  

Participants in this class examine the ways that the working class has (and hasn’t) been portrayed in literary works. In particular, students read novels that illustrate the lives of working-class characters and their relationship to big business, industry, politicians, scientists and society at large. The purpose of the class is not so much to learn literary critique and analysis, as it is to think about, discuss and write about how the working-class has (and hasn’t) been portrayed in literature. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class at the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3137  Children & the Out of School Environment  (3 Credits)  

Explores how children learn and develop as a result of informal educational experiences. Theory and programming related to children learning in diverse out of school settings will be examined. There will be a focus on the role of family, community, neighborhood, and culture on youth development. Historical perspectives on the evolution of out of school learning environments will also be reviewed. Additionally, the course will examine the benefits and positive influences these experiences have on a range of developmental domains (e.g., socio-emotional development, physical health, academic achievement, civic engagement, etc.). Students will also explore various types of out of school learning environments and the corresponding evaluative research documenting the criteria for quality out of school learning programming.

LABR 3140  Writing Labor’s Story  (4 Credits)  

In this course, we will be putting together an anthology of your writing to be used in the next sections of the College Writing course. Your task will be to produce a piece of publishable, researched, non-fiction writing about labor. All the work we do this semester-reading, writing, researching and discussing-will be towards the production of this book. In some way or another, all of you will be writing about work, about the process of work or about the routines of work, or about the locations of work-work that you are familiar with and know about. You will write about things you take for granted, that you never think about, and you will write about them in ways that enlighten your readers, get them thinking about that which they have never noticed. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability.

Attributes: Basic Communication Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3142  Family Development  (3 Credits)  

Using an interdisciplinary perspective, this course is designed to provide an understanding of the concepts and theories related to transitions over the human life cycle. The concepts of continuity and change in individual and family relationships will be explored. We will discuss the various family forms that exist, as well as their unique transitions, challenges, and trends. Additionally, this course will emphasize the role of culture and diversity in the development and functioning of individuals and families. This course is also structured around relating text material to real life experiences. In order to meet this objective, class exercises and assignments will emphasize practical application while promoting active learning and critical thinking.  

LABR 3145  From the Liberty Bell to the Labor Movement  (4 Credits)  

As Justice Louis D. Brandeis once said: "The most important political office is that of the private citizen." This course will examine the political and philosophical underpinning of American government from the distinct perspectives of history and politics in order to build a principled understanding of why, how, and for whom our government works as it does. We will apply humanistic, civic, and practical lenses to analyze the impact of American government on its citizenry and visa versa. We will also analyze the United States of America as a constitutional democratic republic in light of American labor law. This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class through the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Social Science Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3147  Family Stress and Daily Living  (3 Credits)  

This course examines the theoretical, cultural, and sociological perspectives on Family Stress. Common family stressors that shape the daily functioning, interactions, and adaptations of families will be addressed. Risk factors that impact family functioning as well as protective and resiliency factors that assist families in the recovery from stress and adversity will be explored.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3150  Labor on Film  (4 Credits)  

How do the mediums of TV and film frame workers? One goal is for these students to achieve a deeper and wider critical understanding of the history of the labor movement through film, and what some of the key figures in that movement and what other labor and worker rights activists are doing here in the US and around the world through this medium to both grow and maintain existing labor rights. The other chief goal would be to build a greater sense among the students as to their place in the ongoing union movement while gaining an understanding of the language of film and tools related to the medium that they can then put to use in creating their own media concerning the value of being in a union with their coworkers and colleagues-and possibly beyond. This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class through the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Arts Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3152  Capstone I  (3 Credits)  

At the end of this capstone course student should be able to articulate verbally what attending Empire State College, SUNY means to her/him and which courses helped him or her in what ways and how s/he applied the acquired knowledge to work and or life.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3155  Global History: Workers Beyond the West  (4 Credits)  

This course exposes students to scholarly accounts of the rise of industrialization, globally considered, and its impact on work, politics, and the environment, as they research and develop a perspective on current labor issues in non-Western cultures. This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class through the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Other World Civilization Gn Ed, Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3157  Capstone II  (3 Credits)  

At the end of this capstone course the student should have articulated in writing what his/her degree entailed and its application to the outside world. The student should select eight specific courses from his/her discipline concentration and describe how each course helped him/her in his current employment and in what ways s/he applied the acquired knowledge to work and or life.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3160  Public Art as Social Practice: Labor & Cultural Organizing  (4 Credits)  

“Social Practice” art or socially engaged art, focuses more on the social and political relations that may be catalyzed by art--or a critical intervention that might be enacted--than on an art object itself. Much of contemporary practice involves the creation and presentation of the work that is often an ongoing collaboration or movement building with specific communities and in this course the study will be concerned with the labor community. After gaining a grounding in these practices particularly where they intersect labor organizing, the student will take up further study of this work perspective attuned to their own histories-- towards the development of a socially engaged art endeavor. The option also exists to write a final paper about an approved topic in the context of social practice/social justice art in intersection with labor issues that particularly resonates with the student. This course is offered as part of union partnership programs and is open to non-partnership students subject to availability. It is also only offered in-class through the college’s Harry J. Van Arsdale Jr. Center for Labor Studies in New York City.

Attributes: Arts Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3162  Writing Labor  (4 Credits)  

“Writing Labor” provides students with the opportunity to spend a semester working intensively on their writing and writing process, while reflecting on the values of being a trade unionist. Students will use writing as a meaning-making tool, will increase their written fluency, and will be engaged in all stages of the writing process. Texts to be read, reflected and written about will cover what it means to take pride in one’s work, as well as the worth of being a skilled craftsperson. In reading, writing and class discussions, students will be engaged in thinking reflectively and critically about the nature of work. While there is a fair amount of reading to be done in this class, this is primarily a writing course.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3163  Family Intervention for Paras  (3 Credits)  

In this course, students will examine the primary strategies and techniques of helping families, in the context of major theoretical models and diverse sociocultural environments. A significant focus will be on observing, understanding, and intervening with families as they function as systems.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3167  Educational Planning for Painters  (4 Credits)  

This course has three components: a) to create a Degree Plan in order to determine a course of study to reach a degree; b) introduce students to the Degree Program Rationale essay; and c) primarily, to establish the process for individualized Prior Learning Assessment (iPLA) requests.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 3212  Art History for Paraprofessionals  (3 Credits)  

Art History is a course that involves the connection between critical thinking and art to deepen students understanding and knowledge of diverse historical and cultural connections to art. Students will contextualize architecture, sculpture, painting and other sources of media. In this course, students examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from the past and present and from a variety of cultures. Art Movements, artists and “isms” will be explored from cave painting to contemporary art.

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

LABR 3998  Individualized Studies in Labor (LABR)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Labor (LABR). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

LABR 4015  The Labor Movement: Ideas and Institutions  (4 Credits)  

Explore the origins, purposes, methods and future of the labor movement. Students will learn about the historical beginnings of the United States labor movement. Topics include the Knights of Labor and the American Federation of Labor, alternatives to business unionism, including industrial and craft unionism, Marxism, anarcho-syndicalism and the New Left. Students will also examine labor as a social reform movement within capitalism. Through discussion and written assignments, students will apply the theories to actual case studies of workplace and union development. This course is relevant to students interested in studying labor studies, labor relations and human resource management. Students pursuing degrees in business, history, policy studies, political science and philosophy will also find this course pertinent. Prerequisites: None Corequisites: None This course is offered online. This course was previously LAB-263154 The Labor Movement: Ideas and Institutions.

Attributes: Liberal

LABR 4996  Special Topics in LABR  (2-6 Credits)  
LABR 4998  Individualized Studies in Labor (LABR)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Labor (LABR). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.