EMGT: Emergency Management (Undergraduate)

EMGT 1005  Introduction to Emergency Planning  (4 Credits)  

In this course, students will learn to participate effectively in the emergency planning process; explore the need for planning; examine hazard analysis and capability assessment; and help design, coordinate, review and promulgate an emergency operations plan. This course was previously CHS-262814 Introduction to Emergency Planning. Prerequisite knowledge:  The student should be familiar with the fundamental principles of emergency management -- such as mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery -- and the relationship among federal, state and local agencies that share responsibility in managing emergencies.  Such knowledge might be obtained in a course in Introduction to Emergency Management. 

EMGT 1010  Principles & Practices of Emergency Management  (4 Credits)  

This course serves as an introduction to society’s organized response to natural and technological hazards and disasters. It explores the history and evolution of the emergency management profession and investigates the organization of emergency management systems in public and private sectors. Preparing emergency managers with the “must have” knowledge and skills for managing such occurrences can curtail their impacts on society. This emergency management course introduces students to the theories, principles, and approaches to emergency management and disaster preparedness.

Attributes: Liberal

EMGT 1998  Individualized Studies in Emergency Management (EMGT)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Emergency Management (EMGT). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

EMGT 2005  Introduction to Emergency Management  (4 Credits)  

This course introduces the student to the fundamental principles of emergency management and the related practices and policies of the profession. Concepts such as mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery are covered as well as the relationship among federal, state and local agencies who share responsibility in managing emergencies. Further, the social, political and economic implications of disasters are explored.

EMGT 2998  Individualized Studies in Emergency Management (EMGT)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Emergency Management (EMGT). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

EMGT 3005  Disaster Planning & Control  (4 Credits)  

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of 'disaster,' its impact on human populations, the control of its consequences, modes of preparation and planning for disaster contingencies and the institutional context of disaster/fire defense planning. Methods of evaluating fire defense and disaster preparedness programs and the psychological dimensions of disaster related behavior are included. Recommended: previous study in College Writing, Introduction to Public Administration and/or Advanced Fire Administration, plus State and Local Government or equivalents, or have experience in administration, some background in chemistry, as well as fire training and experience. This course was previously CHS-264064 Disaster Planning and Control.

EMGT 3015  Emergency Communications  (4 Credits)  

This course provides students with an understanding of the fundamentals of communications and their application in emergency situations. Students will examine the use of oral and written communications in various levels of emergency and crisis situations. Prerequisite knowledge: The student should be familiar with the fundamental principles of emergency management -- such as mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery -- and the relationship among federal, state and local agencies that share responsibility in managing emergencies.  Such knowledge might be obtained in a course in Introduction to Emergency Management. This course was previously CHS-263824 .

Attributes: Liberal

EMGT 3020  Hazardous Materials & Public Awareness  (4 Credits)  

This study explores various characteristics of hazardous materials which fall on the BNICE spectrum, i.e. biological, nuclear, incendiary, chemical and explosives. These hazardous materials can be physically altered and used as Weapons of Mass Destruction. By studying the chemical and physical properties of hazardous materials, students discover exactly how and why the products are harmful and the range of outcomes that occur when someone is exposed to these substances. Students will learn that the release of hazardous material, whether accidental or intentional can be very harmful to the environment and people. Prerequisites: Introductory Biology or Chemistry

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

EMGT 3025  Incident Management & Leadership  (4 Credits)  

This study explores strategies and tactics used by skilled practitioners and emergency management personnel to protect life and property in their communities. The management of incidents using the Incident Command System, a nationwide standard that is federally mandated, will be explored. Since great managerial qualities often partner with great leadership skills, students will study principle-centered management and be exposed to the necessary methods to make effective decisions in extreme situations.

Attributes: Liberal

EMGT 3030  Leadership & Management in Disaster Response  (4 Credits)  

This course will help students deepen their managerial skills and leadership abilities by studying and applying the Competing Values Framework to management situations and decisions that arise in the course of catastrophic events. Students will learn how to balance the needs for flexibility vs. control and the internal vs. external orientation to enhance the effectiveness of their organization in responding to events. Topics include historical perspectives of management in disasters, management of public resources, information systems, and command systems, understanding managerial styles and leadership strategies, and the elements of decision-making in extreme situations. Prerequisites: Principles of Management, or equivalent experience in some aspect of Emergency Management. NOTE: This course was previously offered as Organization and Management of Disaster Response. Students who have taken 264304, should not enroll in Leadership and Management in Disaster Response. This course was previously CHS-264304 Leadership and Management in Disaster Response.

EMGT 3035  Managing Bioterrorism & Public Health Emergencies  (4 Credits)  

The purpose of this course is to examine the roles and responsibilities of hospitals and public health agencies in planning for, responding to, and recovering from natural and human-made disasters, including bioterrorism. Prerequisites: Depending on student's concentration, an introductory course, or equivalent, in emergency management, health administration, public health, public administration or public policy. This course was previously CHS-264834 Managing Bioterrorism and Public Health Emergencies.

Attributes: Liberal

EMGT 3040  Managing Crisis  (4 Credits)  

This study examines leadership, cooperation, and conflict in times of crisis. Emphasis is on understanding the key dynamics that influence the way that decision makers perceive and respond to crises as well as the organizational and inter-organizational dynamics that impact crisis management. Real life case illustrations, exercises, and simulations will be used to give participants an interactive experience and a realistic understanding of the limitations and opportunities that arise in high-pressure crisis management situations. Though not required, the student is well-advised to have basic knowledge of Emergency Management as evident by the completion of either Introduction to Emergency Management or Principles and Practices of Emergency Management.

Attributes: Liberal

EMGT 3045  Mass Disasters: Implications for Public Policy  (4 Credits)  

This course explores the consequences of federal, state, and local policy decisions on the way that emergency managers carry out their work. An understanding of these consequences can help the emergency manager or policy analyst be an advocate for policies that help communities mitigate, plan and prepare for, respond to, and recover from natural and human-caused disasters. Students will draw policy lessons from studying a variety of disasters, large and small, that have occurred over the past several decades. Topics include federalism and inter-governmental relations and their connection to disaster planning and response, community resilience in recovery, and the legal and ethical obligations of the emergency management profession, among others. Prerequisite knowledge: The student should be familiar with the fundamental principles of emergency management -- such as mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery -- and the relationship among federal, state and local agencies that share responsibility in managing emergencies.  Such knowledge might be obtained in a course in Introduction to Emergency Management. In addition, an understanding of the federalist structure of government and how it affects public policy practice would benefit the student. Such knowledge might be obtained from introductory government courses or a course in Introduction to Public Policy. This course was previously CHS-264854 Mass Disasters: Implications for Public Policy.

Attributes: Liberal

EMGT 3050  Risk Analysis & Hazard Mitigation  (4 Credits)  

This course integrates the strategic planning of an organization or municipal entity with the risk assessment and mitigation process. Risk analysis and hazard mitigation can be applied to a wide range of functions and activities. Several special applications, however, are uniquely significant to organizations that, in the course of delivering their services to the public, cope with high-risk situations as an integral component of their missions. It is a fundamental tenet of risk management that it is an ongoing, evolving, regularly refreshed and continuously improved process. Students will develop an understanding of the complex evolution of risk management as both a concept and a physical fact. This course was previously CHS-264424 Risk Analysis and Hazard Mitigation.

Attributes: Liberal

EMGT 3055  The Role of Emergency Management in Nuclear Responses  (4 Credits)  

This study will analyze how emergency management plays a significant role in disaster responses involving nuclear incidents including accidental and terrorist related incidents.

EMGT 3060  Engineering Disasters  (4 Credits)  

This course will analyze engineering disasters throughout history and discuss their causes and subsequent mitigation practices and/or legislative changes. These disasters include, but are not limited to; the Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse of 1940, the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Explosion in 1986, Big Dig Ceiling Collapse in 2006, and the collapse of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.

EMGT 3996  Special Topics in Emergency Management  (4 Credits)  

The content of this course will vary by term and section. Each offering will be dedicated to a detailed investigation of a focused theme, idea, or problem associated with Emergency Management. Please refer to the Term Guide for course topic offerings. Students may repeat this course for credit as long as the topic differs.

Attributes: Liberal

EMGT 3997  Special Topics in Emergency Management  (2-6 Credits)  

The content of this course will vary by term and section. Each offering will be dedicated to a detailed investigation of a focused theme, idea, or problem associated with Emergency Management. Please refer to the Term Guide for course topic offerings. Students may repeat this course for credit as long as the topic differs.

Attributes: Liberal

EMGT 3998  Individualized Studies in Emergency Management (EMGT)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Emergency Management (EMGT). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

EMGT 4005  Managerial Issues in Hazardous Materials  (4 Credits)  

This course presents current issues in management of a department-wide hazardous materials program. It includes issues that are pertinent to officers and managers in public safety departments. Subjects covered include state, local, and federal emergency response planning, personnel and training, and operational considerations such as determining strategic goals and tactical objectives. Prerequisite knowledge: The student should be familiar with the fundamental principles of emergency management -- such as mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery -- and the relationship among federal, state and local agencies that share responsibility in managing emergencies, as well as an understanding of the need, function, and concept of incident command and general public safety.  Such knowledge might be obtained in a course in Introduction to Emergency Management. This course was previously CHS-264134 Managerial Issues in Hazardous Materials.

EMGT 4010  Strategic Planning for Emergency Services  (4 Credits)  

This study emphasizes strategic planning and management and how they relate to emergency services. Strategic planning is a disciplined effort to produce fundamental decisions and actions that shape what an organization is, what it does, and why it does it. The complex and dynamic environment of strategic planning compels public, nonprofit, and private sector managers to identify priorities, focus scarce resources on those priorities, craft effective strategies, and implement them successfully to ensure survival in the long term.

Attributes: Liberal

EMGT 4122  Disaster Intervention  (4 Credits)  

This course will explore various world wide catastrophic events and examine the means and methods brought to bear in response to these occurrences. Additionally, the politics of intervention will be explored since this complicated process usually determines the extent of the government's role, illustrated by the response of various public and private agencies. This course will explore various world wide catastrophic events and examine the means and methods brought to bear in response to these occurrences. Additionally, the politics of intervention will be explored since this complicated process usually determines the extent of the government's role, illustrated by the response of various public and private agencies.

Attributes: Liberal

EMGT 4998  Individualized Studies in Emergency Management (EMGT)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Emergency Management (EMGT). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.