COMM: Communications (Undergraduate)

COMM 1005  Intercultural Communications  (2-3 Credits)  

Students will explore various approaches to culture and intercultural communication at a foundational level; sample different styles of communication in different countries, ethnicities, and groups; consider the potential for miscommunication in the United States and abroad; and identify strategies for conflict reduction, teamwork, and leadership. After taking this course, students should more sensitive to the communication needs of others and understand how to improve their personal intercultural communication competence. Can be part of a Communications concentration, or an elective for a variety of concentrations. This course was previously CUL-221232 Intercultural Communications.

Attributes: Liberal, Partial Basic Comm Gen Ed

COMM 1010  Interpersonal Communication  (4 Credits)  

The student will be introduced to the communication process and skills for effective interpersonal communication. Concepts related to both verbal and nonverbal communication will be examined. The student will have an opportunity to reflect on his/her own interpersonal communication skills and competencies. Topics such as relational dynamics, interpersonal conflict and improving communication climates will be addressed.

Attributes: Basic Communication Gen Ed, Liberal

COMM 1015  Interpersonal & Small Group Communications  (2 Credits)  

The purpose of this course is to introduce concepts and ideas from the field of interpersonal communication. The course is designed to create awareness of communication issues that we often take for granted and that may cause misunderstandings and problems in interpersonal communication. It is also designed to encourage the application of communication concepts to our own lives as we strive to be successful communicators in society. Through personal inventories, readings, video clips, and short analytical papers, students will learn the principles and apply the strategies for results-oriented communications in workplace settings. This course was previously CUL-222332 Interpersonal and Small Group Communications.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 1020  Introduction to Communication  (4 Credits)  

Why study communication? What can you do with it? Introduction to Communication provides students with an overview of the major fields of communication and key theories that support them. Students will develop an understanding of foundational communication theories at the interpersonal, group, organizational, and mass levels of communication and will apply these theories to evaluate communications in real-world settings. Students will be able to apply verbal and nonverbal communication strategies in order to reach specific audiences and understand how others communicate. Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Ability to write a college level essay. Highly Recommended (not required): College Writing (COMW 1005), or equivalent. This, along with Media Literacy, are the foundation courses in a Communication, Communication and Media, or Communication and Writing Curriculum. It may also be appropriate for students in the social sciences, or as an elective for students who simply want to learn about the field of Communication. This course was previously CUL-221234.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 1030  Public Speaking  (4 Credits)  

Public Speaking provides students with an overview of the inner workings of speech making. Students will investigate the basic elements of a speech, ways to write, conduct, and evaluate speeches, the impact and responsibilities of public speaking, the necessity of considering an audience’s specific needs, and ways to increase comfort while speaking in front of a group. Concepts of speaking, listening, and performing are considered and applied. Students will create and conduct different types of speeches that are tailored to the specific needs of an audience. This course was previously CUL-222614 .

Attributes: Basic Communication Gen Ed, Liberal

COMM 1054  Critical Listening Skills  (4 Credits)  

This study seeks to help students understand different kinds of listening and develop their listening skills. Class time will be spent understanding and practicing listening skills.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 1998  Individualized Studies in Communications (COMM)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Communications (COMM). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

COMM 2005  Communication for Professionals  (4 Credits)  

Communication for Professionals focuses on the theories, processes, and forms of professional communications. Students consider communication variables (e.g., audience, purpose, role, cultural context) to analyze professional communication situations and create effective communications. Students will create a portfolio of professional communications which may include letters, memos, emails, social media posts, negative and persuasive messages, resume, cover letter, business report, and/or proposal. Students will do an oral presentation/speech using visuals. Students are encouraged to create actual communications that they can use at work or in a professional capacity. Assumptions about surrounding courses: appropriate as an elective for students concentrating in Communications/Media, but is not a substitute for Introduction to [Mass] Communication or Media Literacy. This course was previously CUL-222304 Communications for Professionals.

Attributes: Basic Communication Gen Ed, Liberal

COMM 2010  Media Writing  (4 Credits)  

How do you write for maximum impact in a variety of media? What are best practices, and what are common mistakes made in print, online, and in video used to explain, sell, or promote something? This course is designed to help students to understand the operations of mass communication and give them experience developing, analyzing, and critiquing content in advertising, public relations, or journalism. You will come away with a better understanding of the purposes and functions of mass communication, develop skills in producing content for the mass media, and be able to effectively critique mass media products using contemporary communication tools. Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Ability to write college essays Highly Recommended (not required): College Writing (COMW 1005), or equivalent Notes: For students pursuing journalism, communication, or writing, recommend taking after News and Feature Writing. For students pursuing advertising, public relations, or marketing, recommend taking after Marketing Principles. This course was previously CUL-221214 Media Writing.

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

COMM 2016  Digital Communication Strategies I  (3 Credits)  

Communicating in the 21st Century requires specialized skills such as effective videoconferencing, writing for online and mobile platforms, using visual, video and gaming apps, understanding virtual environments, and conducting business remotely. This course teaches the differences between digital and traditional communication methods, with a focus on the fundamentals of communication applied to virtual settings and online tools. You’ll need to participate biweekly as a listener and speaker in one-hour synchronous meetings during the term (4 meetings total) and have access to a device with a microphone and a camera (such as a desktop computer, laptop, tablet or smartphone). Pre-Requisite: ability to write at the college level.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 2104  Communication for Success  (3 Credits)  

Communication for Success is an introduction to college level reading, writing and researching for students who are non-native English language learners. This course has been specifically designed to address the basic expectations of clear, academic expression to help college students write essays, research projects, and presentations that involve the selection, assessment, and usage of appropriate academic resources. Topics of the course include: the difference between social discourse and academic writing; increasing English language skills in vocabulary and mechanics; developing a thesis statement, writing a first draft, editing, paraphrasing arguments and identifying main ideas; citing sources and avoiding plagiarism, as well as using online writing and research resources and the Empire State College virtual library.

Attributes: Basic Communication Gen Ed

COMM 2998  Individualized Studies in Communications (COMM)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Communications (COMM). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

COMM 3005  Communication Analysis  (4 Credits)  

Develop skill in comprehending underlying meanings in public communications. Develop the ability to spot flaws and strengths in others' arguments, detect manipulative communication strategies and recognize mythic/narrative dimensions in everyday communication. Conduct critiques of rhetoric and research propaganda campaigns. Sources for analysis include student-selected items such as speeches, editorials, films, advertisements, or magazine articles. Work with basic principles of argumentation and debate, rhetorical criticism, the narrative paradigm, social influence and propaganda analysis. Develop critical skills for responding competently to the multi-mediated, corporately-managed communication that exists in the current communication environment. Prerequisites: Introduction to Communication or the equivalent. College writing or the equivalent. Ability to use and cite scholarly sources. This course is an upper level Communication and Media elective that is a part of the concentration. It should be taken after foundational courses. This course was previously CUL-223314 Communication Analysis.

Attributes: Basic Communication Gen Ed, Liberal

COMM 3010  Communication Theories  (4 Credits)  

This course introduces students to a wide range of communication theories that help to explore and explain how individuals and groups communicate at the interpersonal, organizational, and mass communication levels. Students will explore a variety of theoretical perspectives and apply theoretical lenses to explain communications and to develop communication strategies for real-life communication situations. Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Ability to write at an upper level Notes: This is designed for students planning to concentrate in some aspect of Communication. Students planning to attend graduate programs in Communications may also want to consider taking Social Science Methods and Theory (or Qualitative and/or Quantitative Methods) and Statistics. Replaces Communication Analysis and Communication Decisions This course was previously CUL-223434 .

Attributes: Basic Communication Gen Ed, Liberal

COMM 3011  Intercultural Communication: Advanced  (4 Credits)  

This Intercultural Communication: Advanced study is designed to introduce students to theoretical concepts of intercultural communication. Students will be introduced to both culture-general concepts (e.g. individualism vs. collectivism) and culture-specific information (e.g. specific cultures of interest regarding racial and ethnic background and values), with a primary focus on culture-general concepts that can be applied in a variety of cultures. Throughout the study, students will be encouraged to think critically about intercultural interactions and to consider how this information may be integrated with their own experiences and approaches to communication in various contexts of interest to them (e.g. business, health care, human services, government, etc.). Prerequisites: Students should be prepared to utilize college-level reading, writing, and critical thinking skills, as well as to conduct research.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 3015  Communication through New Media  (4 Credits)  

This course gives students the chance to use a variety of new media applications to promote a message of their choice (example: marketing a product, spreading news traditional journalistic outlets are not,). Students will study media history, including earlier phases of the Internet, learn to distinguish among various social networking tools. Email, Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter are just a few of the applications one might use to promote a business, send a message to the public, forward news, tell a story, or keep up with old friends and new acquaintances. This course allows students to improve their writing and research skills. Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Ability to write college essays Highly Recommended (not required): College Writing (COMW 1005), or equivalent, ability to use the online library Notes: For students in a Communication concentration, recommend taking after News and Feature Writing and/or Media Writing. For students in any area of business, recommend taking after Marketing Principles. This course was previously CUL-223424 Communication through New Media.

Attributes: Basic Communication Gen Ed, Liberal

COMM 3020  Environmental Communication  (4 Credits)  

The student will explore how communication shapes our perception of the environment and the actions that we take to address environmental issues. The student will learn about current environmental debates and how the media and public forums are used for environmental communication. Environmental conflict resolution will also be introduced. Prerequisites (must complete before registering): Advanced-level reading, writing ,and critical thinking skills

Attributes: Basic Communication Gen Ed, Liberal

COMM 3025  Media Ethics & Law  (3,4 Credits)  

Learn the basic principles and application of the First Amendment as it relates to communications and media. Since First Amendment rights are constantly evolving we will examine its application to free, political, and commercial speech, advertising and ethical components related to them. Explore the government’s monitoring and restriction of media and the balancing act and various tests the courts apply when allowing journalistic reporting versus a defendant’s right to a fair and impartial trial. Media include Print, Radio, Television, Video Games, and the Internet. This course covers ethics and the legal and policy guidelines for in Communications and Media. Appropriate for students considering Law School Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Ability to write a college essay and incorporate and cite scholarly work from the library Highly Recommended (not required): College Writing (COMW 1005), or equivalent, and Introduction to Communication (COMM 1020) Notes: This course is a “junior” level course for students concentrating in communications or media. It should not be a first course in the area, unless they are planning to attend law school and this is one of several legal studies courses they are taking. This course was previously CUL-223884 Media.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 3030  News & Feature Writing  (4 Credits)  

What is journalism? Students will study and practice news writing. Through repeated practice, students will learn how to use journalistic story structures to organize writing; interviewing and other information gathering strategies; protocols of fact-checking; and uses of grammar, sentence structure, and style to strengthen overall writing. While the course is designed to offer students interested in possible careers in journalism an introduction to the trade, it also will appeal to those interested in strengthening their overall writing and editing skills. Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Completion of the General Education requirement in Basic Communication. Highly Recommended (not required): College Writing (COMW 1005), or equivalent, and information literacy skills and ability to conduct library research Notes: This is an appropriate course as part of the Concentration for students concentrating in Communications, Media, Journalism, Writing or similar Concentrations. Students in other areas may choose it as an elective This course was previously CUL-221614 News and Feature Writing.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 3035  Reading & Writing the Essay  (4 Credits)  

Reading and Writing the Essay focuses on the essay as an effective means of written communication. Students will first read and analyze personal essays from a series of major essayists, noting the writing styles, rhetorical strategies employed, themes explored, and intended audience. As they write and revise their own essays, students will develop confidence and proficiency exploring ideas and expressing them in the essay format. Attention will be paid to clarity, form and artistic development. Students who have not yet met the Basic Communication requirement may have prior writing experience in their chosen discipline and need an advanced-level study. This course can also offer another genre to explore for students pursuing a concentration in writing.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 3045  Television & Culture  (4 Credits)  

Television is an important influence on our culture, and is definitely not 'just entertainment.' In this course, you will study television as a cultural artifact. Students will investigate television's distinctive features, programming and cultural impact. Acquire skill in interpreting the sort of cultural impact television programs may have on viewers. Discover the way television's generic conventions create limits on the creativity of television producers. Become a more knowledgeable and selective viewer. Learn to interpret television ratings and track the performance of various shows. Read and critically evaluate articles. This course can include considerations of theory, history, and ethics. Highly Recommended (not required): A lower level study in media literacy or critical or literary theory This course, and The American Cinema, are appropriate for students beginning upper level work. It’s a good “sequel” to Media and Visual Literacy and a good predecessor to Women, Girls, and the Media, or any other course about “difference” in the media such as race, sexuality etc. This course was previously CUL-223354 Television and Culture.

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

COMM 3055  Organizational Communication  (3 Credits)  

The purpose of this course is to understand basic principles of organizational and communication theory. The course examines the theories and practice of organizational communication, as well as the modern practice in written, oral, and online communications used in organizations. Specific attention will be given to the themes of communication, empowerment, and technology and their impact on organizations.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 3060  Political Communication  (3 Credits)  

This course explores the ways in which popular media shape and reflect perceptions of politics and government, the structural and situational factors which shape political discourse and the recurrent motives and purposes of communicators. A practical approach is used in the course, with an emphasis on the creation and assessment of political campaign communications.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 3065  Global Communications  (3 Credits)  

This course brings together diverse issues and perspectives in the rapidly evolving area of international/global communication. Through multidimensional perspectives, the immense scope, disparity, and complexity of global communications will be examined. Students will critically assess shifts in national, regional, and international media patterns of production, distribution, and consumption in the larger context of globalization. Essential concepts of international communication will be examined, such as trends in national and global media consolidation, cultural implications of globalization, international broadcasting, information flow, international communication law and regulation, and trends in communication and information technologies. Pre-requisites: Mass Communication & Society or a similar introductory course in communication theories or media studies. Assumptions about surrounding related courses: This is a capstone course for students in communications and media studies.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 3070  Leadership Communication  (4 Credits)  

Leadership Communication addresses theories, processes, forms and techniques of professional communication for leaders in all contexts. Students will explore issues of active listening, motivation, conflict resolution/mediation and interpersonal communication techniques as well as analyze communication situations and create effective communication in a variety of media. Students will be exposed to the power of persuasion, humor, vocal dynamics, physical energy, a strong message and the desire to communicate. Students will prepare oral presentations using PowerPoint or similar types of presentation tools. Prerequisites: Students should have basic computer and college level writing skills.

Attributes: Basic Communication Gen Ed, Liberal

COMM 3122  Rhetorical Dimensions of Race Class & Gender  (3 Credits)  

Exploration of race, class and gender, with an emphasis on conceptual tools developed since the 1970s in both empirical studies and critical thought about these categories. The students will develop analytic methods for understanding distinctions and controversies, e.g., the difference between sex and gender; the difference between race and ethnicity; arguments for and against affirmative action; and the ways in which race, gender and class overlap.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 3127  Advanced Public Relations  (3,4 Credits)  

By combining academic thinking in PR with practical tasks in strategy development and implementation based on real life examples, the course provides an insight in core tasks of the Communications and Public Affairs functions within organizations. The course builds on the previously gained knowledge of basic PR concepts and extends on it, with focus on particular capabilities in development of communications strategies for corporate reputation building and protection, corporate social responsibility programs and marketing PR programs. The interrelation of Communications and Public Affairs function with other management disciplines, as well as processes of engaging key external stakeholders, are explained. Building on the knowledge gained in the “Public Relations Principles” course, it will extend particularly on the development of communication strategies for various subfields of corporate communication and PR.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 3996  Special Topics in COMM  (1-6 Credits)  

The content of this course will vary by term and section. Students may repeat this course for credit as long as the topic differs. Please refer to the Term Guide for course topic offerings.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 3997  Special Topics in COMM  (1-6 Credits)  

The content of this course will vary by term and section. Students may repeat this course for credit as long as the topic differs. Please refer to the Term Guide for course topic offerings.

COMM 3998  Individualized Studies in Communications (COMM)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Communications (COMM). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.

COMM 4005  Capstone in Communication & Media  (4 Credits)  

Are you close to graduation and planning a career in communications, journalism, advertising, PR, broadcasting, digital media, or Internet content creation? Have you been studying media as a cultural form and plan to continue, in graduate school or on your own? If so, this course is for you. Consider 'new economy' solutions to the changing media environment through readings, research, interviews, and discussions, develop or refine a resume and portfolio or web site of past work that will present you as someone who is prepared for an entry level job or to study the subject further, and develop a past paper into a writing sample. Prerequisites (must complete before registering): At least 3 upper level courses in Communications, Media Studies, or related field Notes: Designed for students within 24 credits of Graduation. Designed as a final course, for students done with most concentration courses and Ed Planning. Gives Ed Planning credit, however, not a substitute for planning the degree as currently constructed. This course was previously CUL-224324 Capstone in Media and Communications.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 4010  Visual Communications: Ways of Seeing  (4 Credits)  

This is a study of visual communication, rhetoric and advanced visual literacy. In this study, students will learn how persuasive visual arguments are created and will read about several key theories and movements within media studies.

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

COMM 4015  Women Girls & the Media  (4 Credits)  

In this course, students will examine the portrayals of women and teenage girls in the media. Each student will choose which particular media to examine, choosing to examine magazines, newspapers, television, film, popular music and/or the Internet along with the advertising that supports so many of these. Students may pursue such topics as race and ethnic issues, class issues, working women v. motherhood, body images of teen, younger and older women, disability, and sexuality. They may focus on American culture or on the global needs of women. Prerequisites (must complete before registering): Ability to write at an advanced level, and conduct scholarly research. Highly Recommended (not required): After Media Literacy, and at least one of: Television and Culture, American Cinema, American Popular Music in the 20th Century or Images of Women in Western Civilization Note: This is a very advanced course. Students should have previous experience with some kind of media or cultural studies. This course was previously CUL-224114 Women.

Attributes: Humanities Gen Ed, Liberal

COMM 4025  Communication Decisions  (4 Credits)  

This is an advanced level course for students in Communications and/or Media studies, designed to enable students to apply basic rhetorical and communication theories to the decision making process. Students also identify and examine effective forms of communication technologies for such purposes. Prerequisite (must complete before registering): The successful completion of Mass Communications & Society (CUST 3045) or Speech Communication, or equivalent introductory communications course Assumptions about Surrounding Related Courses: Communications Decisions is designed as a capstone course for students with concentrations in Communications.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 4030  Communication Technologies  (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to provide students with a broad overview of new communication technologies and their social, societal, cultural and psychological impacts. The course also provides an understanding of the fundamentals of the Internet, email, wireless devices, intranets, and other communication technical concepts and develops practical skills in using and evaluating the technologies based on criteria such as appropriateness, effectiveness and impact for communications purposes. Special attention is paid to recent changes in search engines, business, advertising, journalism, privacy, and security, resulting from technology developments and mobility. Students will receive practical experience in using a few of the newest applications, to gain a better understanding of the usefulness and utility of new technologies.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 4123  Senior Project Proposal  (2 Credits)  

The student will prepare a proposal for the senior project and engage in educational planning. The senior project facilitates the integration and reflection of knowledge acquired from university learning which is aimed at creating an original culminating work. Educational planning includes the preparation of a rationale essay articulating how the program of study for the bachelor's degree meets the student's educational and career goals. For the senior project proposal, the student will pose a question to be addressed under the guidance of the ESC mentor. The student and mentor will discuss the focus and design of the research question to be developed. The student will identify the appropriate resources needed to address the question and submit the proposal to the mentor. The thesis, based on the proposal submitted for this study, will be carried out the following semester. Prerequisites (must complete before registering): All lower level concentration courses shsould be complete, as well as at least two advanced level concentration courses or their equivalent Notes: As part of a capstone course, students should enroll in Senior Project Proposal during their final year of study. This course will be used as part of the Educational Planning credit.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 4150  Senior Project Thesis  (3 Credits)  

The student will complete the senior project thesis as planned in the proposal phase of this study. The project provides an opportunity to conduct an in-depth examination of a topic of interest related to the study program that emerged from the student’s earlier course work, and in this regard will complete educational planning by focusing on the mastery of academic skills, college level writing and presentation, and independent research and critical thinking. The student will be expected to produce a major research paper that meets the standards established during the proposal stage and prepare the final drafts of the rationale essay. Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Successful completion of Senior Project Proposal (COMM 4123) Note:This course will be used as part of the Educational Planning credit.

Attributes: Liberal

COMM 4998  Individualized Studies in Communications (COMM)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Communications (COMM). Please contact your mentor/advisor for more details.