CHEM: Chemistry (Undergraduate)

CHEM 1000  Survey of Chemistry  (4 Credits)  

This course is a one term introduction to general, organic, and biochemistry. The topics covered include atomic structure; bonding theory; chemical reactions including oxidation/reduction and acid/base; reaction rates and equilibria; intermolecular forces and phases of matter; solutions; nuclear chemistry; molecular structure; organic compounds and reactions; and the biological macromolecules. Note: This course is designed for non-science majors and it does not meet the guidelines for Chemistry or Biology concentrations.

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

CHEM 1002  Chemistry and Society  (4 Credits)  

This study is designed for non-science majors. It will introduce the fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry and apply them to understand a variety of contemporary environmental and socio-technological issues. Core chemistry topics include atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometric calculations, chemical bonding, periodicity of properties of the elements, thermochemistry, properties of gases and solutions, chemical reactions, and an overview of the classes of organic. Principles of chemistry will be applied to the consideration of quality of air and water, global warming, acid rain, energy production and utilization, synthetic materials, recycling, drugs, and nutrition. Highly Recommended (not required): The ability to manipulate simple algebraic expressions Note: No prior knowledge of chemistry is required.

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

CHEM 1004  Chemistry: A Forensic Perspective  (4 Credits)  

This study would be of interest to students with concentrations in Criminal Justice and Fire Science. It introduces the vocabulary of chemistry, its fundamental principles, and some of the most common analytical techniques used in forensic analysis. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometric calculations, chemical bonding, periodicity of properties of the elements, properties of gases and solutions, chemical reactions, kinetics and equilibrium, nuclear chemistry, and an overview of main classes of organic and biochemical compounds. Applications of chemical principles to criminal investigations will be explored via numerous real-life examples and crime scene case studies. Highly Recommended (not required): The ability to manipulate simple algebraic expressions Note: No prior knowledge of chemistry is required.

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

CHEM 1200  General Chemistry I  (4 Credits)  

General Chemistry I is the first part of a two-term course sequence designed for students majoring in natural sciences. It introduces fundamental laws and principles of chemistry. Topics include atomic theory of matter, classification and nomenclature of inorganic compounds, stoichiometry, reactions in aqueous solutions, thermochemistry, electronic structure of atoms, periodicity of properties of the elements, chemical bonding, bonding theories, and molecular geometry. This course includes an experimental component. Highly Recommended (not required): Students should be able to manipulate simple algebraic expressions. Prior exposure to chemistry through successful completion of a high school chemistry course, college Introduction to Chemistry course, or equivalent knowledge gained through professional training is recommended. Note: Students should select either this course or Chemistry I with Lab (CHEM 1205).

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

CHEM 1201  General Chemistry II  (4 Credits)  

General Chemistry II is the continuation of a two-term course sequence designed for students majoring in natural sciences. It introduces fundamental laws and principles of chemistry. Topics include properties and kinetic molecular theory of gases, gas laws, properties of liquids, intermolecular forces, solutions and their colligative properties, chemical kinetics and reaction mechanisms, chemical equilibrium, acid-base theories and equilibria, buffers, acid-base titrations, chemical thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. This course includes an experimental component. Prerequisite (must complete before registering): General Chemistry I (CHEM 1200) or Chemistry I with Lab (CHEM 1205) Facility with solving equations using quadratic formula and manipulating logarithmic and exponential expressions is required. Note: Student should select either this course or Chemistry II with Lab.

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

CHEM 1205  Chemistry I with Lab  (4 Credits)  

Chemistry I with Lab is the first course of the two-term sequence in general chemistry for science majors. It teaches students to understand the basic chemical principles behind chemical reactions. The course will start by introducing the definitions and tools used in chemistry, and will then move on to present the models used to describe atoms and molecules and their interactions (chemical bonds). The student will learn to predict, write, and balance chemical reactions, including the exchange of heat (energy). The students will also learn the characteristic behaviors of gases, liquids and solids. Students will gain experience in basic laboratory techniques. Note: Students should select either General Chemistry I (CHEM 1200) or Chemistry I with Lab (CHEM 1205) This course was previously SMT-271044 Chemistry I.

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

CHEM 1206  Chemistry II with Lab  (4 Credits)  

Chemistry II with Lab is the second course of the two-term sequence in general chemistry for science majors. The course will examine the characteristics of aqueous solutions, followed by the principles and applications of kinetics and chemical equilibrium. Specific chemical reactions will be explored, including acid-base neutralization, precipitation, and solubility. Attention will then focus on thermodynamics and electrochemistry. After introducing the basics of nuclear chemistry, heavy isotopes, and radiation, the trends of reactivity and characteristics of metals and non-metals will be presented, followed by an overview of the basic chemistry of organic compounds. Students will gain further experience in basic laboratory techniques. Prerequisites: Chemistry I with Lab, General Chemistry I, or equivalent. Students should select either Chemistry II with Lab or General Chemistry II. This course was previously SMT-271054 Chemistry II.

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

CHEM 1210  Chemistry I  (3 Credits)  

Chemistry I is the first course of a two-term sequence in general chemistry for science concentrations. This three-credit course covers the lecture and not the laboratory component of the sequence, which is offered as a separate course. Students will learn the basic chemical principles behind chemical reactions. They will study the models used to describe atoms and molecules and the chemical bonds that form between them. Students will learn to predict, write, and balance chemical reactions. Other topics will include exchange of heat (energy) and characteristic behaviors of gases, liquids and solids. This lecture course complements the lab component covered in Chemistry I Laboratory, but it is not a co-requisite to the lab.

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

CHEM 1211  Chemistry I Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

This is a one-credit laboratory course that supports the Chemistry I course. Students will learn basic knowledge of the general principles of chemistry through laboratory exercises. Students will practice laboratory techniques using chemical laboratory equipment. This laboratory course complements the lecture component covered in Chemistry I, but it is not a co-requisite to the lecture.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 1212  Chemistry II  (3 Credits)  

Chemistry II is the second course of a two-term sequence in general chemistry for science concentrations. This three-credit course covers the lecture and not the laboratory component of the sequence, which is offered as a separate course. Students will learn the characteristics of aqueous solutions, and the applications of kinetics and chemical equilibrium. They will study specific chemical reactions, such as acid-base neutralization, precipitation, and solubility. Other topics will include thermodynamics, electrochemistry, introduction to nuclear chemistry, characteristics of metals and non-metals, and basic chemistry of organic compounds. This lecture course complements the lab component covered in Chemistry II Laboratory, but it is not a co-requisite to the lab. Prerequisites: Chemistry I with Lab, General Chemistry I, or equivalent

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

CHEM 1213  Chemistry II Laboratory  (1 Credits)  

This is a one-credit laboratory course that supports the Chemistry II course. Students will learn basic knowledge of the general principles of chemistry through laboratory exercises. Students will practice laboratory techniques using chemical laboratory equipment. This laboratory course complements the lecture component covered in Chemistry II, but it is not a co-requisite to the lecture. Chemistry I with Lab, General Chemistry I, or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 1994  Special Topics in Chemistry  (1-8 Credits)  

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 1995  Special Topics in Chemistry  (1-8 Credits)  

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 1996  Special Topics in Chemistry  (1-8 Credits)  

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 1997  Special Topics in Chemistry  (1-8 Credits)  

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 1998  Individualized Studies in Chemistry (CHEM)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Chemistry (CHEM). Registration for this class must be approved by the student’s mentor.

CHEM 2000  Chemistry: General Organic & Biochemistry I  (4 Credits)  

This course is designed for students concentrating in allied health fields. It introduces the fundamental principles of general chemistry, and begins examining the core topics in organic chemistry. Topics in general chemistry include atomic structure and periodicity of properties of the elements; structure and properties of ionic and covalent compounds; chemical equations and calculations; states of matter; properties of solutions; energy, reaction rates, and chemical equilibria; acid-base and oxidation-reduction reactions; and radioactivity and nuclear medicine. Topics in organic chemistry focus on structure and properties of the following classes of organic compounds: alkanes, cycloalkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatic compounds, alcohols, ethers, and thiols. Highly Recommended (not required): Prior exposure to high-school chemistry. Students should be able to manipulate simple algebraic expressions.

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

CHEM 2001  Chemistry: General Organic & Biochemistry II  (4 Credits)  

This course is designed for students concentrating in allied health fields. This second part of a two-term course sequence continues examining the core topics in organic chemistry, including stereochemistry and structure and properties of the following classes of organic compounds: amines, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and anhydrides, esters, and amides. The principles of organic chemistry are applied in surveying the properties and reactions of the major classes of biologically relevant macromolecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, hormones, neurotransmitters, and nucleic acids. Topics in biochemistry also include chemical signaling, gene expression and protein synthesis, bioenergetics, and catabolic pathways. Prerequisites: Chemistry: General, Organic and Biochemistry I This course is designed for students concentrating in allied health fields.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 2220  Organic Chemistry  (4 Credits)  

This survey of organic chemistry may be of interest to students concentrating in life sciences. It will examine on structure, properties, and reactions of the main classes of organic compounds: alkanes and cycloalkanes; alkenes and alkynes; aromatic compounds (benzene and its derivatives); alcohols, ethers, and thiols; amines; aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, anhydrides, esters, and amines; and stereochemistry of organic molecules. Students will be introduced to functional group chemistry, reaction mechanisms, the relationship between molecular structure and reactivity, and to main spectroscopic techniques used for molecular structure elucidation. Numerous examples will illustrate the biological and medical applications of organic chemistry. Prerequisites (must complete before registering): General Chemistry I (CHEM 1200) and General Chemistry II (CHEM 1201), or equivalent Note: This study might be of interest to students with concentrations in life sciences. Students pursuing concentration in chemistry are to take Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 3220) and Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 3221).

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 2998  Individualized Studies in Chemistry (CHEM)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Chemistry (CHEM). Registration for this class must be approved by the student’s mentor.

CHEM 3200  Inorganic Chemistry  (4 Credits)  

This one semester survey of modern inorganic chemistry introduces descriptive inorganic chemistry, with emphasis on its physical principles and practical applications. Topics include chemical bonding, molecular orbital theory, symmetry and group theory, main group elements, the crystalline solid state, acid-base and donor-acceptor chemistry of d-block metals, and the structure, bonding, reactivity, electronic spectra, and some reaction mechanisms of their coordination compounds. Prerequisites: General Chemistry I and II, or Chemistry with Lab I and II Note that this is a stand-alone course. It should not be taken by students planning to take Inorganic the two-course sequence Chemistry I and II.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 3210  Organic Chemistry I with Lab  (4 Credits)  

Organic Chemistry I with Lab is the first course of a two-term sequence in organic chemistry designed for science concentrations. The discipline of organic chemistry involves identifying the molecular structure and properties of substances found in nature, and finding ways of synthesizing these substances. This Organic Chemistry I with Lab course introduces students to many of the basic concepts required for this process. Students will investigate the mechanisms of organic reactions to gain the ability to predict the outcomes of similar reactions. Other topics will include nomenclature, molecular structure, chemical reactivity, isomers, thermodynamics, and kinetics. Students will gain experience in organic chemistry laboratory techniques.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 3220  Organic Chemistry I  (4 Credits)  

Organic Chemistry I is the first part of a two-term course sequence designed for students majoring in physical and life sciences. It introduces fundamental principles of organic chemistry with an emphasis on functional group chemistry, the relationship between molecular structure and reactivity, and reaction mechanisms. Topics include classes of organic compounds and their functional groups; nomenclature; organic reactions and their mechanisms; isomerism; properties and conformations of alkanes and cycloalkanes; stereochemistry; alkyl halides and nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions; properties, synthesis and reactions of alkenes and alkynes; and main spectroscopic tools for molecular structure elucidation. Prerequisites: General Chemistry I and II, or Chemistry I and II with Lab

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 3221  Organic Chemistry II  (4 Credits)  

Organic Chemistry II is the second part of a two-term course sequence designed for students majoring in physical and life sciences. It continues to introduce the study of structure, reactions, and synthesis of the major classes of organic compounds. Topics include radical reactions, alcohols and ethers, conjugated unsaturated systems, aromatic compounds, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and amines. Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry I.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 3300  Physical Chemistry I  (4 Credits)  

This course is designed for students majoring in Chemistry and requires strong quantitative skills. The goal of the two-term course sequence in Physical Chemistry is to introduce students to the theoretical models and laws that help explain the physical, thermal, electrical and chemical properties of matter. The main focus of this first part of the sequence will be kinetic molecular theory of gases, gas laws, and the three laws of thermodynamics. Additional topics will be selected among: free energy and chemical potential, chemical equilibrium, electrolyte and nonelectrolyte solutions, electrochemistry, and chemical kinetics Prerequisites: General Chemistry I and II, or Chemistry I and II with Lab; and, Algebra or Precalculus. Basic knowledge of Calculus is strongly preferred.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 3302  Physical Chemistry II  (4 Credits)  

This course is designed for students majoring in Chemistry and requires strong quantitative skills. The goal of the Physical Chemistry course sequence is to introduce students to the theoretical models and laws that help explain the physical, thermal, electrical and chemical properties of matter. The focus of this second part of the sequence will be Quantum Chemistry, the Solid State and Surface Thermodynamics. Specific topics will include: Introduction to Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Mechanics Model Systems, the Hydrogen Atom, Atomic and Molecular Orbital Theories, Symmetry in Quantum Mechanics, Rotational Spectroscopy, Vibrational Spectroscopy, Electronic Spectroscopy, Magnetic Spectroscopy, and Statistical Thermodynamics. Prerequisites: Physical Chemistry I.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 3400  Biochemistry  (4 Credits)  

This study focuses on explaining biology in chemical terms. Its main topics are subdivided into three categories. The first one, structure and function of biomolecules, covers properties of water, acids, bases, and buffers; amino acids and peptide bonds; three-dimensional structure of proteins; enzymes, enzyme kinetics, and mechanisms; coenzymes, and vitamins; carbohydrates; and lipids and biological membranes. The second category, energetics and metabolism, includes glycolysis, Krebs cycle, glycogen mechanism and gluconeogenesis, electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism, amino acids and nucleotide metabolism. Finally, the third category, genetic information, focuses on nucleic acids and related biochemical pathways. Prerequisites: Chemistry I with Lab, General Chemistry, or equivalent; Chemistry II with Lab, General Chemistry II, or equivalent; Biology I with Lab, Introduction to Cell Biology and Genetics, or equivalent; and Biology II with Lab, Introduction to Organismal Biology, or equivalent. This course is designed for science students who would prefer one term of Biochemistry. It should not be taken by students planning to take Biochemistry I and II. This course was previously SMT-273264 Biochemistry.

Attributes: Natural Science Gen Ed, Liberal

CHEM 3600  Principles of Instrumental Analysis: Spectroscopy & Separation Techniques  (4 Credits)  

This course is designed for science majors. A survey of spectroscopic and chromatographic methods, including theoretical background and operating principles of chemical instrumentation, will be provided. Application of these methods of instrumental analysis to solutions of chemical problems, including identification and characterization of chemical compounds, will be emphasized. Topics in molecular spectroscopy include UV-Visible and Infrared spectroscopy, Mass Spectrometry, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. Techniques of separation include single- and multi-stage methods, with emphasis on gas and liquid chromatography. Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry II, and Physics II with Lab II or equivalent.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 3602  Quantitative Chemical Analysis  (4 Credits)  

This course is designed for science majors. It focuses on physical understanding of the principles of analytical chemistry and their applications in chemistry and other disciplines, including life and environmental sciences. Selected modern analytical techniques will be surveyed with emphasis on their operating principles and on applications of theoretical principles and analytical instruments to practical problem solving. Topics include: the analytical process, measurements, analytical tools, experimental error, quality assurance and calibration methods, activity, systematic treatment of chemical equilibria, acid-base equilibria and titrations, fundamentals of electrochemistry, types of electrodes, potentiometry, and electroanalytical techniques. Prerequisites: General Chemistry I and II, or Chemistry I and II with Lab.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 3996  Special Topics in CHEM  (2-6 Credits)  

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 3998  Individualized Studies in Chemistry (CHEM)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Chemistry (CHEM). Registration for this class must be approved by the student’s mentor.

CHEM 4200  Inorganic Chemistry I  (4 Credits)  

This is the first part of the two term course sequence in inorganic chemistry, designed for chemistry majors. It introduces descriptive inorganic chemistry, with emphasis on its physical principles and practical applications. Topics include chemical bonding in polyatomic molecules, molecular symmetry and group theory, the crystalline solid state, acid-base reactions in aqueous and non-aqueous media, redox chemistry, chemical characterization techniques, and properties and reactions of the main group elements. Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry II, and Physical Chemistry I.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 4201  Inorganic Chemistry II  (4 Credits)  

This second study in the two-term course sequence of modern inorganic chemistry focuses on the d-block metals. Topics include characteristic physical and chemical properties and reactivity of metals, their coordination chemistry, isomerism, valence bond model and molecular orbital theories, crystal field stabilization, electronic absorption and emission spectra, and magnetic properties. The discussion of general principles is followed by a systematic consideration of the d-block metals, their physical properties, chemistry of their inorganic, coordination, and organometallic compounds, and the importance of these inorganic and organometallic compounds in industry, catalysis, materials, nanotechnology, and biological processes. Prerequisite (must complete before registering): Inorganic Chemistry I (CHEM 4200)

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 4300  Environmental Chemistry I  (4 Credits)  

Environmental Chemistry I is the first part of a two-term course sequence designed for advanced level students majoring in natural sciences. The purpose of the Environmental Chemistry studies is for the student to gain knowledge about the chemistry of current environmental problems in order to critically evaluate them and provide possible solutions to these issues. Main topics that will be covered this first part of the sequence include: atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, energy and climate change. The study will also devote time to learn about Green Chemistry, the initiative set forth to encourage chemical companies to develop products and processes that reduce environmental hazards. Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry I.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 4301  Environmental Chemistry II  (4 Credits)  

Environmental Chemistry II is the second part of a two-term course sequence designed for advanced level students majoring in natural sciences. This second course of the sequence will focus on toxic organic chemicals, water pollution, soil pollution and purification techniques. In addition, students will continue to learn about processes that have been developed to meet Green Chemistry standards. Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry I and Environmental Chemistry I

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 4400  Biochemistry I  (4 Credits)  

This course is the first part of a two term course sequence designed for students majoring in chemistry and life sciences. Its main objectives are to explain biology in chemical terms; introduce the language of biochemistry; examine physical, chemical, and biological context of biochemical reaction mechanisms; establish the relationship between structure and function and between different biochemical processes; and explore the most important biochemical research techniques. The main topics include the structure and function of the four major classes of biomolecules - proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids, as well as the biological membranes and transport. Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry I and II A background in physical chemistry is helpful, but not required.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 4401  Biochemistry II  (4 Credits)  

This second portion of the two term course sequence in biochemistry, designed for students majoring in chemistry and life sciences, will focus on biosignaling, bioenergetics, organization and regulation of biosynthetic pathways, metabolism, DNA replication and RNA transcription. Topics include the principles of bioenergetics; degradation and biosynthesis of carbohydrates, fatty acids, amino acids, and nucleic acids; signal transduction; oxidative phosphorylation; and integration and regulation of metabolism. Prerequisites: Biochemistry I.

Attributes: Liberal

CHEM 4998  Individualized Studies in Chemistry (CHEM)  (1-8 Credits)  

Students have the opportunity to develop individualized studies with their mentor in Chemistry (CHEM). Registration for this class must be approved by the student’s mentor.